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From: Simon.Richter at hogyros.de (Simon Richter)
Subject: FDA Approves Use of Chip in Patients ? HIPAA woes?

Hi,

> It is just a rapid way of identifying people which is not a bad thing in 
> some circumstances.  Some catagories of patient carry alert bracelets to 
> inform any medical practitioners that they have certain severe reactions 
> or specific medical conditions.

I would immediately accept a chip that does not contain my name, but
only neccessary medical details and would use encryption to only hand
out certain details to medical staff. This will still mean that
diabetics need their bracelets, as the people who need to call an
ambulance do not have access to a scanner, but it will definitely help
in treating comatose patients found on the side of the road.

The technical implementation will, however, be difficult (what to do
about leaked private keys that will give access to the chip, for
example).

I wonder whether it would be possible to form a collective opinion on
that matter, since it is something that is likely to happen and
definitely needs to be pushed into the right direction.

   Simon

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