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Date: Fri, 16 Aug 2013 19:31:27 +0200
From: Jann Horn <jann@...jh.net>
To: full-disclosure@...ts.grok.org.uk
Subject: Re: Who's behind limestonenetworks.com AKA DDoS
 on polipo(8123)

On Thu, Aug 15, 2013 at 05:29:52PM -0300, Luther Blissett wrote:
> Hello dear companions,
> 
> Two days ago one of my tor exit nodes experienced something I'm now
> calling "limestonenetworks DDoS on polipo" ( $WAN_IP:8123 ), since all

DDoS? So you mean your systems were impacted by that?


> packets in the storm were flowing from a range of 514 different IP
> addresses, all of them inside limestonenetworks IP range and targeting
> port 8123 on my tor exit node WAN IP.

Let me google that for you. Hmm. Assigned to "Polipo Web proxy". So maybe
someone tried to connect to them through your exit node and they do proxyscans
on people who connect to them?


> Before the packet storm,

Oooh, a storm!


> The attack persisted for at least three hours and left this binary (hex
> represented):
> 
> 0000000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
> *
> 0000b90 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 2067 3331
> 0000ba0 3220 3a30 3135 303a 2034 6174 6567 7573
> 0000bb0 7568 7520 6573 2e72 6177 6e72 6b20 7265
> 0000bc0 656e 3a6c 5b20 6168 6d6d 7265 205d 203a
> 0000bd0 4e49 763d 616c 326e 4f20 5455 203d 414d
> 0000be0 3d43 3030 323a 3a31 3732 663a 3a61 6464
> 0000bf0 343a 3a34 3030 313a 3a35 3966 323a 3a61
> 0000c00 6639 643a 3a39 3830 303a 3a30 3534 303a
> 0000c10 3a30 3030 333a 2034 5253 3d43 3132 2e36
> 0000c20 3432 2e35 3232 2e31 3031 2037 5344 3d54
> 0000c30 3831 2e39 3833 322e 3533 322e 3035 4c20
> 0000c40 4e45 353d 2032 4f54 3d53 7830 3030 5020
> 0000c50 4552 3d43 7830 3030 5420 4c54 343d 2038
> 0000c60 4449 313d 3335 3431 4420 2046 5250 544f
> 0000c70 3d4f 4354 2050 5053 3d54 3932 3635 4420
> 0000c80 5450 383d 3231 2033 4957 444e 574f 363d
> 0000c90 3535 3533 5220 5345 303d 3078 2030 5953
> 0000ca0 204e 5255 5047 303d 000a               
> 0000ca9

Maybe your disk is just broken?


> Attached is the list of participating IP addresses, line by line, with
> the count of packets received. The attacker started sending something
> like 4 packets per second and increased to over than 9000!!! - just
> kidding, over 30 per second.


Your systems were impacted by a DoS attack with 30 packets per second? You might
want to upgrade to hardware that is a few decades newer.

> 74.63.255.118: 248 
> 216.245.193.201: 235 
> 208.115.232.205: 231 
> 74.63.255.119: 225 
> 216.245.193.200: 219
[...]
> O=TCP SPT=2216 : 1 

You were attacked by "O=TCP SPT=2216"? Cool story.

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