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Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2014 22:37:05 +0200
From: Robert Dannhauer <r.dannhauer@...glemail.com>
To: Rikairchy <blakcshadow@...il.com>
Cc: fulldisclosure@...lists.org
Subject: Re: [FD] keybase.io

Thanks to Rikairchy I was able to take a look. They are saying:
"For safety, the Keybase servers never see your passphrase, even during
login, and therefore cannot decrypt your private key. "
The only question: Can this be trusted? Can we make sure they don't know
the passphrase?
Even though this looks like a nice service.

PS: Thanks Rikairchy :)


On Fri, Jun 20, 2014 at 10:22 PM, Rikairchy <blakcshadow@...il.com> wrote:

> I have a few questions regarding this website.
>
> For those of you unfamiliar with it, (to my knowledge) a GPG
> keyserver, website, and client for easy upload. The client supports
> signing, encrypting, and verifying messages as does the website. There
> is also an option to "track" users, verifying who they are in a way.
> In short, public tracking and awareness of identities.
>
> There are also ways to verify github account, twitter account, and
> website ownership on keybase.
>
> There is an option to create as well as upload your private key. I'm
> very new to this type of encryption, having only worked with
> Truecrypt, SSH, and Bitloccker prior, but I was under the impression
> that the private key was the last thing you should part with. Why
> would a website focused on providing security allow users to upload
> their private keys?
>
> As mentioned, there are github, twitter, and website ownership
> verification options, tied to your GPG public key. This does no more
> than verifies that someone that has access to @username on twitter and
> example.net (which are both listed on a user's keybase.io profile) are
> controlled by the same person, but not the identity of said person,
> correct?
>
> I also have keybase.io invites if this interests anyone.
>
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