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Date:	Fri, 1 Jan 2010 20:36:09 -0800
From:	Randy Dunlap <randy.dunlap@...cle.com>
To:	lkml <linux-kernel@...r.kernel.org>,
	torvalds <torvalds@...ux-foundation.org>
Cc:	Kusanagi Kouichi <slash@...auone-net.jp>
Subject: [PATCH 4/4] Documentation: Rename Documentation/DMA-mapping.txt

From: Kusanagi Kouichi <slash@...auone-net.jp>
Subject: Documentation: Rename Documentation/DMA-mapping.txt

It seems that Documentation/DMA-mapping.txt was supposed to be renamed
to Documentation/PCI/PCI-DMA-mapping.txt.

Signed-off-by: Kusanagi Kouichi <slash@...auone-net.jp>
Signed-off-by: Randy Dunlap <randy.dunlap@...cle.com>
---
 Documentation/DMA-mapping.txt         |  766 ------------------------
 Documentation/PCI/PCI-DMA-mapping.txt |  766 ++++++++++++++++++++++++
 Documentation/block/biodoc.txt        |    2 
 3 files changed, 767 insertions(+), 767 deletions(-)
 delete mode 100644 Documentation/DMA-mapping.txt
 create mode 100644 Documentation/PCI/PCI-DMA-mapping.txt

--- linux-2.6.33-rc2-git4.orig/Documentation/DMA-mapping.txt
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,766 +0,0 @@
-			Dynamic DMA mapping
-			===================
-
-		 David S. Miller <davem@...hat.com>
-		 Richard Henderson <rth@...nus.com>
-		  Jakub Jelinek <jakub@...hat.com>
-
-This document describes the DMA mapping system in terms of the pci_
-API.  For a similar API that works for generic devices, see
-DMA-API.txt.
-
-Most of the 64bit platforms have special hardware that translates bus
-addresses (DMA addresses) into physical addresses.  This is similar to
-how page tables and/or a TLB translates virtual addresses to physical
-addresses on a CPU.  This is needed so that e.g. PCI devices can
-access with a Single Address Cycle (32bit DMA address) any page in the
-64bit physical address space.  Previously in Linux those 64bit
-platforms had to set artificial limits on the maximum RAM size in the
-system, so that the virt_to_bus() static scheme works (the DMA address
-translation tables were simply filled on bootup to map each bus
-address to the physical page __pa(bus_to_virt())).
-
-So that Linux can use the dynamic DMA mapping, it needs some help from the
-drivers, namely it has to take into account that DMA addresses should be
-mapped only for the time they are actually used and unmapped after the DMA
-transfer.
-
-The following API will work of course even on platforms where no such
-hardware exists, see e.g. arch/x86/include/asm/pci.h for how it is implemented on
-top of the virt_to_bus interface.
-
-First of all, you should make sure
-
-#include <linux/pci.h>
-
-is in your driver. This file will obtain for you the definition of the
-dma_addr_t (which can hold any valid DMA address for the platform)
-type which should be used everywhere you hold a DMA (bus) address
-returned from the DMA mapping functions.
-
-			 What memory is DMA'able?
-
-The first piece of information you must know is what kernel memory can
-be used with the DMA mapping facilities.  There has been an unwritten
-set of rules regarding this, and this text is an attempt to finally
-write them down.
-
-If you acquired your memory via the page allocator
-(i.e. __get_free_page*()) or the generic memory allocators
-(i.e. kmalloc() or kmem_cache_alloc()) then you may DMA to/from
-that memory using the addresses returned from those routines.
-
-This means specifically that you may _not_ use the memory/addresses
-returned from vmalloc() for DMA.  It is possible to DMA to the
-_underlying_ memory mapped into a vmalloc() area, but this requires
-walking page tables to get the physical addresses, and then
-translating each of those pages back to a kernel address using
-something like __va().  [ EDIT: Update this when we integrate
-Gerd Knorr's generic code which does this. ]
-
-This rule also means that you may use neither kernel image addresses
-(items in data/text/bss segments), nor module image addresses, nor
-stack addresses for DMA.  These could all be mapped somewhere entirely
-different than the rest of physical memory.  Even if those classes of
-memory could physically work with DMA, you'd need to ensure the I/O
-buffers were cacheline-aligned.  Without that, you'd see cacheline
-sharing problems (data corruption) on CPUs with DMA-incoherent caches.
-(The CPU could write to one word, DMA would write to a different one
-in the same cache line, and one of them could be overwritten.)
-
-Also, this means that you cannot take the return of a kmap()
-call and DMA to/from that.  This is similar to vmalloc().
-
-What about block I/O and networking buffers?  The block I/O and
-networking subsystems make sure that the buffers they use are valid
-for you to DMA from/to.
-
-			DMA addressing limitations
-
-Does your device have any DMA addressing limitations?  For example, is
-your device only capable of driving the low order 24-bits of address
-on the PCI bus for SAC DMA transfers?  If so, you need to inform the
-PCI layer of this fact.
-
-By default, the kernel assumes that your device can address the full
-32-bits in a SAC cycle.  For a 64-bit DAC capable device, this needs
-to be increased.  And for a device with limitations, as discussed in
-the previous paragraph, it needs to be decreased.
-
-pci_alloc_consistent() by default will return 32-bit DMA addresses.
-PCI-X specification requires PCI-X devices to support 64-bit
-addressing (DAC) for all transactions. And at least one platform (SGI
-SN2) requires 64-bit consistent allocations to operate correctly when
-the IO bus is in PCI-X mode. Therefore, like with pci_set_dma_mask(),
-it's good practice to call pci_set_consistent_dma_mask() to set the
-appropriate mask even if your device only supports 32-bit DMA
-(default) and especially if it's a PCI-X device.
-
-For correct operation, you must interrogate the PCI layer in your
-device probe routine to see if the PCI controller on the machine can
-properly support the DMA addressing limitation your device has.  It is
-good style to do this even if your device holds the default setting,
-because this shows that you did think about these issues wrt. your
-device.
-
-The query is performed via a call to pci_set_dma_mask():
-
-	int pci_set_dma_mask(struct pci_dev *pdev, u64 device_mask);
-
-The query for consistent allocations is performed via a call to
-pci_set_consistent_dma_mask():
-
-	int pci_set_consistent_dma_mask(struct pci_dev *pdev, u64 device_mask);
-
-Here, pdev is a pointer to the PCI device struct of your device, and
-device_mask is a bit mask describing which bits of a PCI address your
-device supports.  It returns zero if your card can perform DMA
-properly on the machine given the address mask you provided.
-
-If it returns non-zero, your device cannot perform DMA properly on
-this platform, and attempting to do so will result in undefined
-behavior.  You must either use a different mask, or not use DMA.
-
-This means that in the failure case, you have three options:
-
-1) Use another DMA mask, if possible (see below).
-2) Use some non-DMA mode for data transfer, if possible.
-3) Ignore this device and do not initialize it.
-
-It is recommended that your driver print a kernel KERN_WARNING message
-when you end up performing either #2 or #3.  In this manner, if a user
-of your driver reports that performance is bad or that the device is not
-even detected, you can ask them for the kernel messages to find out
-exactly why.
-
-The standard 32-bit addressing PCI device would do something like
-this:
-
-	if (pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(32))) {
-		printk(KERN_WARNING
-		       "mydev: No suitable DMA available.\n");
-		goto ignore_this_device;
-	}
-
-Another common scenario is a 64-bit capable device.  The approach
-here is to try for 64-bit DAC addressing, but back down to a
-32-bit mask should that fail.  The PCI platform code may fail the
-64-bit mask not because the platform is not capable of 64-bit
-addressing.  Rather, it may fail in this case simply because
-32-bit SAC addressing is done more efficiently than DAC addressing.
-Sparc64 is one platform which behaves in this way.
-
-Here is how you would handle a 64-bit capable device which can drive
-all 64-bits when accessing streaming DMA:
-
-	int using_dac;
-
-	if (!pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(64))) {
-		using_dac = 1;
-	} else if (!pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(32))) {
-		using_dac = 0;
-	} else {
-		printk(KERN_WARNING
-		       "mydev: No suitable DMA available.\n");
-		goto ignore_this_device;
-	}
-
-If a card is capable of using 64-bit consistent allocations as well,
-the case would look like this:
-
-	int using_dac, consistent_using_dac;
-
-	if (!pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(64))) {
-		using_dac = 1;
-	   	consistent_using_dac = 1;
-		pci_set_consistent_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(64));
-	} else if (!pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(32))) {
-		using_dac = 0;
-		consistent_using_dac = 0;
-		pci_set_consistent_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(32));
-	} else {
-		printk(KERN_WARNING
-		       "mydev: No suitable DMA available.\n");
-		goto ignore_this_device;
-	}
-
-pci_set_consistent_dma_mask() will always be able to set the same or a
-smaller mask as pci_set_dma_mask(). However for the rare case that a
-device driver only uses consistent allocations, one would have to
-check the return value from pci_set_consistent_dma_mask().
-
-Finally, if your device can only drive the low 24-bits of
-address during PCI bus mastering you might do something like:
-
-	if (pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(24))) {
-		printk(KERN_WARNING
-		       "mydev: 24-bit DMA addressing not available.\n");
-		goto ignore_this_device;
-	}
-
-When pci_set_dma_mask() is successful, and returns zero, the PCI layer
-saves away this mask you have provided.  The PCI layer will use this
-information later when you make DMA mappings.
-
-There is a case which we are aware of at this time, which is worth
-mentioning in this documentation.  If your device supports multiple
-functions (for example a sound card provides playback and record
-functions) and the various different functions have _different_
-DMA addressing limitations, you may wish to probe each mask and
-only provide the functionality which the machine can handle.  It
-is important that the last call to pci_set_dma_mask() be for the
-most specific mask.
-
-Here is pseudo-code showing how this might be done:
-
-	#define PLAYBACK_ADDRESS_BITS	DMA_BIT_MASK(32)
-	#define RECORD_ADDRESS_BITS	DMA_BIT_MASK(24)
-
-	struct my_sound_card *card;
-	struct pci_dev *pdev;
-
-	...
-	if (!pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, PLAYBACK_ADDRESS_BITS)) {
-		card->playback_enabled = 1;
-	} else {
-		card->playback_enabled = 0;
-		printk(KERN_WARNING "%s: Playback disabled due to DMA limitations.\n",
-		       card->name);
-	}
-	if (!pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, RECORD_ADDRESS_BITS)) {
-		card->record_enabled = 1;
-	} else {
-		card->record_enabled = 0;
-		printk(KERN_WARNING "%s: Record disabled due to DMA limitations.\n",
-		       card->name);
-	}
-
-A sound card was used as an example here because this genre of PCI
-devices seems to be littered with ISA chips given a PCI front end,
-and thus retaining the 16MB DMA addressing limitations of ISA.
-
-			Types of DMA mappings
-
-There are two types of DMA mappings:
-
-- Consistent DMA mappings which are usually mapped at driver
-  initialization, unmapped at the end and for which the hardware should
-  guarantee that the device and the CPU can access the data
-  in parallel and will see updates made by each other without any
-  explicit software flushing.
-
-  Think of "consistent" as "synchronous" or "coherent".
-
-  The current default is to return consistent memory in the low 32
-  bits of the PCI bus space.  However, for future compatibility you
-  should set the consistent mask even if this default is fine for your
-  driver.
-
-  Good examples of what to use consistent mappings for are:
-
-	- Network card DMA ring descriptors.
-	- SCSI adapter mailbox command data structures.
-	- Device firmware microcode executed out of
-	  main memory.
-
-  The invariant these examples all require is that any CPU store
-  to memory is immediately visible to the device, and vice
-  versa.  Consistent mappings guarantee this.
-
-  IMPORTANT: Consistent DMA memory does not preclude the usage of
-             proper memory barriers.  The CPU may reorder stores to
-	     consistent memory just as it may normal memory.  Example:
-	     if it is important for the device to see the first word
-	     of a descriptor updated before the second, you must do
-	     something like:
-
-		desc->word0 = address;
-		wmb();
-		desc->word1 = DESC_VALID;
-
-             in order to get correct behavior on all platforms.
-
-	     Also, on some platforms your driver may need to flush CPU write
-	     buffers in much the same way as it needs to flush write buffers
-	     found in PCI bridges (such as by reading a register's value
-	     after writing it).
-
-- Streaming DMA mappings which are usually mapped for one DMA transfer,
-  unmapped right after it (unless you use pci_dma_sync_* below) and for which
-  hardware can optimize for sequential accesses.
-
-  This of "streaming" as "asynchronous" or "outside the coherency
-  domain".
-
-  Good examples of what to use streaming mappings for are:
-
-	- Networking buffers transmitted/received by a device.
-	- Filesystem buffers written/read by a SCSI device.
-
-  The interfaces for using this type of mapping were designed in
-  such a way that an implementation can make whatever performance
-  optimizations the hardware allows.  To this end, when using
-  such mappings you must be explicit about what you want to happen.
-
-Neither type of DMA mapping has alignment restrictions that come
-from PCI, although some devices may have such restrictions.
-Also, systems with caches that aren't DMA-coherent will work better
-when the underlying buffers don't share cache lines with other data.
-
-
-		 Using Consistent DMA mappings.
-
-To allocate and map large (PAGE_SIZE or so) consistent DMA regions,
-you should do:
-
-	dma_addr_t dma_handle;
-
-	cpu_addr = pci_alloc_consistent(pdev, size, &dma_handle);
-
-where pdev is a struct pci_dev *. This may be called in interrupt context.
-You should use dma_alloc_coherent (see DMA-API.txt) for buses
-where devices don't have struct pci_dev (like ISA, EISA).
-
-This argument is needed because the DMA translations may be bus
-specific (and often is private to the bus which the device is attached
-to).
-
-Size is the length of the region you want to allocate, in bytes.
-
-This routine will allocate RAM for that region, so it acts similarly to
-__get_free_pages (but takes size instead of a page order).  If your
-driver needs regions sized smaller than a page, you may prefer using
-the pci_pool interface, described below.
-
-The consistent DMA mapping interfaces, for non-NULL pdev, will by
-default return a DMA address which is SAC (Single Address Cycle)
-addressable.  Even if the device indicates (via PCI dma mask) that it
-may address the upper 32-bits and thus perform DAC cycles, consistent
-allocation will only return > 32-bit PCI addresses for DMA if the
-consistent dma mask has been explicitly changed via
-pci_set_consistent_dma_mask().  This is true of the pci_pool interface
-as well.
-
-pci_alloc_consistent returns two values: the virtual address which you
-can use to access it from the CPU and dma_handle which you pass to the
-card.
-
-The cpu return address and the DMA bus master address are both
-guaranteed to be aligned to the smallest PAGE_SIZE order which
-is greater than or equal to the requested size.  This invariant
-exists (for example) to guarantee that if you allocate a chunk
-which is smaller than or equal to 64 kilobytes, the extent of the
-buffer you receive will not cross a 64K boundary.
-
-To unmap and free such a DMA region, you call:
-
-	pci_free_consistent(pdev, size, cpu_addr, dma_handle);
-
-where pdev, size are the same as in the above call and cpu_addr and
-dma_handle are the values pci_alloc_consistent returned to you.
-This function may not be called in interrupt context.
-
-If your driver needs lots of smaller memory regions, you can write
-custom code to subdivide pages returned by pci_alloc_consistent,
-or you can use the pci_pool API to do that.  A pci_pool is like
-a kmem_cache, but it uses pci_alloc_consistent not __get_free_pages.
-Also, it understands common hardware constraints for alignment,
-like queue heads needing to be aligned on N byte boundaries.
-
-Create a pci_pool like this:
-
-	struct pci_pool *pool;
-
-	pool = pci_pool_create(name, pdev, size, align, alloc);
-
-The "name" is for diagnostics (like a kmem_cache name); pdev and size
-are as above.  The device's hardware alignment requirement for this
-type of data is "align" (which is expressed in bytes, and must be a
-power of two).  If your device has no boundary crossing restrictions,
-pass 0 for alloc; passing 4096 says memory allocated from this pool
-must not cross 4KByte boundaries (but at that time it may be better to
-go for pci_alloc_consistent directly instead).
-
-Allocate memory from a pci pool like this:
-
-	cpu_addr = pci_pool_alloc(pool, flags, &dma_handle);
-
-flags are SLAB_KERNEL if blocking is permitted (not in_interrupt nor
-holding SMP locks), SLAB_ATOMIC otherwise.  Like pci_alloc_consistent,
-this returns two values, cpu_addr and dma_handle.
-
-Free memory that was allocated from a pci_pool like this:
-
-	pci_pool_free(pool, cpu_addr, dma_handle);
-
-where pool is what you passed to pci_pool_alloc, and cpu_addr and
-dma_handle are the values pci_pool_alloc returned. This function
-may be called in interrupt context.
-
-Destroy a pci_pool by calling:
-
-	pci_pool_destroy(pool);
-
-Make sure you've called pci_pool_free for all memory allocated
-from a pool before you destroy the pool. This function may not
-be called in interrupt context.
-
-			DMA Direction
-
-The interfaces described in subsequent portions of this document
-take a DMA direction argument, which is an integer and takes on
-one of the following values:
-
- PCI_DMA_BIDIRECTIONAL
- PCI_DMA_TODEVICE
- PCI_DMA_FROMDEVICE
- PCI_DMA_NONE
-
-One should provide the exact DMA direction if you know it.
-
-PCI_DMA_TODEVICE means "from main memory to the PCI device"
-PCI_DMA_FROMDEVICE means "from the PCI device to main memory"
-It is the direction in which the data moves during the DMA
-transfer.
-
-You are _strongly_ encouraged to specify this as precisely
-as you possibly can.
-
-If you absolutely cannot know the direction of the DMA transfer,
-specify PCI_DMA_BIDIRECTIONAL.  It means that the DMA can go in
-either direction.  The platform guarantees that you may legally
-specify this, and that it will work, but this may be at the
-cost of performance for example.
-
-The value PCI_DMA_NONE is to be used for debugging.  One can
-hold this in a data structure before you come to know the
-precise direction, and this will help catch cases where your
-direction tracking logic has failed to set things up properly.
-
-Another advantage of specifying this value precisely (outside of
-potential platform-specific optimizations of such) is for debugging.
-Some platforms actually have a write permission boolean which DMA
-mappings can be marked with, much like page protections in the user
-program address space.  Such platforms can and do report errors in the
-kernel logs when the PCI controller hardware detects violation of the
-permission setting.
-
-Only streaming mappings specify a direction, consistent mappings
-implicitly have a direction attribute setting of
-PCI_DMA_BIDIRECTIONAL.
-
-The SCSI subsystem tells you the direction to use in the
-'sc_data_direction' member of the SCSI command your driver is
-working on.
-
-For Networking drivers, it's a rather simple affair.  For transmit
-packets, map/unmap them with the PCI_DMA_TODEVICE direction
-specifier.  For receive packets, just the opposite, map/unmap them
-with the PCI_DMA_FROMDEVICE direction specifier.
-
-		  Using Streaming DMA mappings
-
-The streaming DMA mapping routines can be called from interrupt
-context.  There are two versions of each map/unmap, one which will
-map/unmap a single memory region, and one which will map/unmap a
-scatterlist.
-
-To map a single region, you do:
-
-	struct pci_dev *pdev = mydev->pdev;
-	dma_addr_t dma_handle;
-	void *addr = buffer->ptr;
-	size_t size = buffer->len;
-
-	dma_handle = pci_map_single(pdev, addr, size, direction);
-
-and to unmap it:
-
-	pci_unmap_single(pdev, dma_handle, size, direction);
-
-You should call pci_unmap_single when the DMA activity is finished, e.g.
-from the interrupt which told you that the DMA transfer is done.
-
-Using cpu pointers like this for single mappings has a disadvantage,
-you cannot reference HIGHMEM memory in this way.  Thus, there is a
-map/unmap interface pair akin to pci_{map,unmap}_single.  These
-interfaces deal with page/offset pairs instead of cpu pointers.
-Specifically:
-
-	struct pci_dev *pdev = mydev->pdev;
-	dma_addr_t dma_handle;
-	struct page *page = buffer->page;
-	unsigned long offset = buffer->offset;
-	size_t size = buffer->len;
-
-	dma_handle = pci_map_page(pdev, page, offset, size, direction);
-
-	...
-
-	pci_unmap_page(pdev, dma_handle, size, direction);
-
-Here, "offset" means byte offset within the given page.
-
-With scatterlists, you map a region gathered from several regions by:
-
-	int i, count = pci_map_sg(pdev, sglist, nents, direction);
-	struct scatterlist *sg;
-
-	for_each_sg(sglist, sg, count, i) {
-		hw_address[i] = sg_dma_address(sg);
-		hw_len[i] = sg_dma_len(sg);
-	}
-
-where nents is the number of entries in the sglist.
-
-The implementation is free to merge several consecutive sglist entries
-into one (e.g. if DMA mapping is done with PAGE_SIZE granularity, any
-consecutive sglist entries can be merged into one provided the first one
-ends and the second one starts on a page boundary - in fact this is a huge
-advantage for cards which either cannot do scatter-gather or have very
-limited number of scatter-gather entries) and returns the actual number
-of sg entries it mapped them to. On failure 0 is returned.
-
-Then you should loop count times (note: this can be less than nents times)
-and use sg_dma_address() and sg_dma_len() macros where you previously
-accessed sg->address and sg->length as shown above.
-
-To unmap a scatterlist, just call:
-
-	pci_unmap_sg(pdev, sglist, nents, direction);
-
-Again, make sure DMA activity has already finished.
-
-PLEASE NOTE:  The 'nents' argument to the pci_unmap_sg call must be
-              the _same_ one you passed into the pci_map_sg call,
-	      it should _NOT_ be the 'count' value _returned_ from the
-              pci_map_sg call.
-
-Every pci_map_{single,sg} call should have its pci_unmap_{single,sg}
-counterpart, because the bus address space is a shared resource (although
-in some ports the mapping is per each BUS so less devices contend for the
-same bus address space) and you could render the machine unusable by eating
-all bus addresses.
-
-If you need to use the same streaming DMA region multiple times and touch
-the data in between the DMA transfers, the buffer needs to be synced
-properly in order for the cpu and device to see the most uptodate and
-correct copy of the DMA buffer.
-
-So, firstly, just map it with pci_map_{single,sg}, and after each DMA
-transfer call either:
-
-	pci_dma_sync_single_for_cpu(pdev, dma_handle, size, direction);
-
-or:
-
-	pci_dma_sync_sg_for_cpu(pdev, sglist, nents, direction);
-
-as appropriate.
-
-Then, if you wish to let the device get at the DMA area again,
-finish accessing the data with the cpu, and then before actually
-giving the buffer to the hardware call either:
-
-	pci_dma_sync_single_for_device(pdev, dma_handle, size, direction);
-
-or:
-
-	pci_dma_sync_sg_for_device(dev, sglist, nents, direction);
-
-as appropriate.
-
-After the last DMA transfer call one of the DMA unmap routines
-pci_unmap_{single,sg}. If you don't touch the data from the first pci_map_*
-call till pci_unmap_*, then you don't have to call the pci_dma_sync_*
-routines at all.
-
-Here is pseudo code which shows a situation in which you would need
-to use the pci_dma_sync_*() interfaces.
-
-	my_card_setup_receive_buffer(struct my_card *cp, char *buffer, int len)
-	{
-		dma_addr_t mapping;
-
-		mapping = pci_map_single(cp->pdev, buffer, len, PCI_DMA_FROMDEVICE);
-
-		cp->rx_buf = buffer;
-		cp->rx_len = len;
-		cp->rx_dma = mapping;
-
-		give_rx_buf_to_card(cp);
-	}
-
-	...
-
-	my_card_interrupt_handler(int irq, void *devid, struct pt_regs *regs)
-	{
-		struct my_card *cp = devid;
-
-		...
-		if (read_card_status(cp) == RX_BUF_TRANSFERRED) {
-			struct my_card_header *hp;
-
-			/* Examine the header to see if we wish
-			 * to accept the data.  But synchronize
-			 * the DMA transfer with the CPU first
-			 * so that we see updated contents.
-			 */
-			pci_dma_sync_single_for_cpu(cp->pdev, cp->rx_dma,
-						    cp->rx_len,
-						    PCI_DMA_FROMDEVICE);
-
-			/* Now it is safe to examine the buffer. */
-			hp = (struct my_card_header *) cp->rx_buf;
-			if (header_is_ok(hp)) {
-				pci_unmap_single(cp->pdev, cp->rx_dma, cp->rx_len,
-						 PCI_DMA_FROMDEVICE);
-				pass_to_upper_layers(cp->rx_buf);
-				make_and_setup_new_rx_buf(cp);
-			} else {
-				/* Just sync the buffer and give it back
-				 * to the card.
-				 */
-				pci_dma_sync_single_for_device(cp->pdev,
-							       cp->rx_dma,
-							       cp->rx_len,
-							       PCI_DMA_FROMDEVICE);
-				give_rx_buf_to_card(cp);
-			}
-		}
-	}
-
-Drivers converted fully to this interface should not use virt_to_bus any
-longer, nor should they use bus_to_virt. Some drivers have to be changed a
-little bit, because there is no longer an equivalent to bus_to_virt in the
-dynamic DMA mapping scheme - you have to always store the DMA addresses
-returned by the pci_alloc_consistent, pci_pool_alloc, and pci_map_single
-calls (pci_map_sg stores them in the scatterlist itself if the platform
-supports dynamic DMA mapping in hardware) in your driver structures and/or
-in the card registers.
-
-All PCI drivers should be using these interfaces with no exceptions.
-It is planned to completely remove virt_to_bus() and bus_to_virt() as
-they are entirely deprecated.  Some ports already do not provide these
-as it is impossible to correctly support them.
-
-		Optimizing Unmap State Space Consumption
-
-On many platforms, pci_unmap_{single,page}() is simply a nop.
-Therefore, keeping track of the mapping address and length is a waste
-of space.  Instead of filling your drivers up with ifdefs and the like
-to "work around" this (which would defeat the whole purpose of a
-portable API) the following facilities are provided.
-
-Actually, instead of describing the macros one by one, we'll
-transform some example code.
-
-1) Use DECLARE_PCI_UNMAP_{ADDR,LEN} in state saving structures.
-   Example, before:
-
-	struct ring_state {
-		struct sk_buff *skb;
-		dma_addr_t mapping;
-		__u32 len;
-	};
-
-   after:
-
-	struct ring_state {
-		struct sk_buff *skb;
-		DECLARE_PCI_UNMAP_ADDR(mapping)
-		DECLARE_PCI_UNMAP_LEN(len)
-	};
-
-   NOTE: DO NOT put a semicolon at the end of the DECLARE_*()
-         macro.
-
-2) Use pci_unmap_{addr,len}_set to set these values.
-   Example, before:
-
-	ringp->mapping = FOO;
-	ringp->len = BAR;
-
-   after:
-
-	pci_unmap_addr_set(ringp, mapping, FOO);
-	pci_unmap_len_set(ringp, len, BAR);
-
-3) Use pci_unmap_{addr,len} to access these values.
-   Example, before:
-
-	pci_unmap_single(pdev, ringp->mapping, ringp->len,
-			 PCI_DMA_FROMDEVICE);
-
-   after:
-
-	pci_unmap_single(pdev,
-			 pci_unmap_addr(ringp, mapping),
-			 pci_unmap_len(ringp, len),
-			 PCI_DMA_FROMDEVICE);
-
-It really should be self-explanatory.  We treat the ADDR and LEN
-separately, because it is possible for an implementation to only
-need the address in order to perform the unmap operation.
-
-			Platform Issues
-
-If you are just writing drivers for Linux and do not maintain
-an architecture port for the kernel, you can safely skip down
-to "Closing".
-
-1) Struct scatterlist requirements.
-
-   Struct scatterlist must contain, at a minimum, the following
-   members:
-
-	struct page *page;
-	unsigned int offset;
-	unsigned int length;
-
-   The base address is specified by a "page+offset" pair.
-
-   Previous versions of struct scatterlist contained a "void *address"
-   field that was sometimes used instead of page+offset.  As of Linux
-   2.5., page+offset is always used, and the "address" field has been
-   deleted.
-
-2) More to come...
-
-			Handling Errors
-
-DMA address space is limited on some architectures and an allocation
-failure can be determined by:
-
-- checking if pci_alloc_consistent returns NULL or pci_map_sg returns 0
-
-- checking the returned dma_addr_t of pci_map_single and pci_map_page
-  by using pci_dma_mapping_error():
-
-	dma_addr_t dma_handle;
-
-	dma_handle = pci_map_single(pdev, addr, size, direction);
-	if (pci_dma_mapping_error(pdev, dma_handle)) {
-		/*
-		 * reduce current DMA mapping usage,
-		 * delay and try again later or
-		 * reset driver.
-		 */
-	}
-
-			   Closing
-
-This document, and the API itself, would not be in it's current
-form without the feedback and suggestions from numerous individuals.
-We would like to specifically mention, in no particular order, the
-following people:
-
-	Russell King <rmk@....linux.org.uk>
-	Leo Dagum <dagum@...rel.engr.sgi.com>
-	Ralf Baechle <ralf@....sgi.com>
-	Grant Grundler <grundler@....hp.com>
-	Jay Estabrook <Jay.Estabrook@...paq.com>
-	Thomas Sailer <sailer@....ee.ethz.ch>
-	Andrea Arcangeli <andrea@...e.de>
-	Jens Axboe <jens.axboe@...cle.com>
-	David Mosberger-Tang <davidm@....hp.com>
--- /dev/null
+++ linux-2.6.33-rc2-git4/Documentation/PCI/PCI-DMA-mapping.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,766 @@
+			Dynamic DMA mapping
+			===================
+
+		 David S. Miller <davem@...hat.com>
+		 Richard Henderson <rth@...nus.com>
+		  Jakub Jelinek <jakub@...hat.com>
+
+This document describes the DMA mapping system in terms of the pci_
+API.  For a similar API that works for generic devices, see
+DMA-API.txt.
+
+Most of the 64bit platforms have special hardware that translates bus
+addresses (DMA addresses) into physical addresses.  This is similar to
+how page tables and/or a TLB translates virtual addresses to physical
+addresses on a CPU.  This is needed so that e.g. PCI devices can
+access with a Single Address Cycle (32bit DMA address) any page in the
+64bit physical address space.  Previously in Linux those 64bit
+platforms had to set artificial limits on the maximum RAM size in the
+system, so that the virt_to_bus() static scheme works (the DMA address
+translation tables were simply filled on bootup to map each bus
+address to the physical page __pa(bus_to_virt())).
+
+So that Linux can use the dynamic DMA mapping, it needs some help from the
+drivers, namely it has to take into account that DMA addresses should be
+mapped only for the time they are actually used and unmapped after the DMA
+transfer.
+
+The following API will work of course even on platforms where no such
+hardware exists, see e.g. arch/x86/include/asm/pci.h for how it is implemented on
+top of the virt_to_bus interface.
+
+First of all, you should make sure
+
+#include <linux/pci.h>
+
+is in your driver. This file will obtain for you the definition of the
+dma_addr_t (which can hold any valid DMA address for the platform)
+type which should be used everywhere you hold a DMA (bus) address
+returned from the DMA mapping functions.
+
+			 What memory is DMA'able?
+
+The first piece of information you must know is what kernel memory can
+be used with the DMA mapping facilities.  There has been an unwritten
+set of rules regarding this, and this text is an attempt to finally
+write them down.
+
+If you acquired your memory via the page allocator
+(i.e. __get_free_page*()) or the generic memory allocators
+(i.e. kmalloc() or kmem_cache_alloc()) then you may DMA to/from
+that memory using the addresses returned from those routines.
+
+This means specifically that you may _not_ use the memory/addresses
+returned from vmalloc() for DMA.  It is possible to DMA to the
+_underlying_ memory mapped into a vmalloc() area, but this requires
+walking page tables to get the physical addresses, and then
+translating each of those pages back to a kernel address using
+something like __va().  [ EDIT: Update this when we integrate
+Gerd Knorr's generic code which does this. ]
+
+This rule also means that you may use neither kernel image addresses
+(items in data/text/bss segments), nor module image addresses, nor
+stack addresses for DMA.  These could all be mapped somewhere entirely
+different than the rest of physical memory.  Even if those classes of
+memory could physically work with DMA, you'd need to ensure the I/O
+buffers were cacheline-aligned.  Without that, you'd see cacheline
+sharing problems (data corruption) on CPUs with DMA-incoherent caches.
+(The CPU could write to one word, DMA would write to a different one
+in the same cache line, and one of them could be overwritten.)
+
+Also, this means that you cannot take the return of a kmap()
+call and DMA to/from that.  This is similar to vmalloc().
+
+What about block I/O and networking buffers?  The block I/O and
+networking subsystems make sure that the buffers they use are valid
+for you to DMA from/to.
+
+			DMA addressing limitations
+
+Does your device have any DMA addressing limitations?  For example, is
+your device only capable of driving the low order 24-bits of address
+on the PCI bus for SAC DMA transfers?  If so, you need to inform the
+PCI layer of this fact.
+
+By default, the kernel assumes that your device can address the full
+32-bits in a SAC cycle.  For a 64-bit DAC capable device, this needs
+to be increased.  And for a device with limitations, as discussed in
+the previous paragraph, it needs to be decreased.
+
+pci_alloc_consistent() by default will return 32-bit DMA addresses.
+PCI-X specification requires PCI-X devices to support 64-bit
+addressing (DAC) for all transactions. And at least one platform (SGI
+SN2) requires 64-bit consistent allocations to operate correctly when
+the IO bus is in PCI-X mode. Therefore, like with pci_set_dma_mask(),
+it's good practice to call pci_set_consistent_dma_mask() to set the
+appropriate mask even if your device only supports 32-bit DMA
+(default) and especially if it's a PCI-X device.
+
+For correct operation, you must interrogate the PCI layer in your
+device probe routine to see if the PCI controller on the machine can
+properly support the DMA addressing limitation your device has.  It is
+good style to do this even if your device holds the default setting,
+because this shows that you did think about these issues wrt. your
+device.
+
+The query is performed via a call to pci_set_dma_mask():
+
+	int pci_set_dma_mask(struct pci_dev *pdev, u64 device_mask);
+
+The query for consistent allocations is performed via a call to
+pci_set_consistent_dma_mask():
+
+	int pci_set_consistent_dma_mask(struct pci_dev *pdev, u64 device_mask);
+
+Here, pdev is a pointer to the PCI device struct of your device, and
+device_mask is a bit mask describing which bits of a PCI address your
+device supports.  It returns zero if your card can perform DMA
+properly on the machine given the address mask you provided.
+
+If it returns non-zero, your device cannot perform DMA properly on
+this platform, and attempting to do so will result in undefined
+behavior.  You must either use a different mask, or not use DMA.
+
+This means that in the failure case, you have three options:
+
+1) Use another DMA mask, if possible (see below).
+2) Use some non-DMA mode for data transfer, if possible.
+3) Ignore this device and do not initialize it.
+
+It is recommended that your driver print a kernel KERN_WARNING message
+when you end up performing either #2 or #3.  In this manner, if a user
+of your driver reports that performance is bad or that the device is not
+even detected, you can ask them for the kernel messages to find out
+exactly why.
+
+The standard 32-bit addressing PCI device would do something like
+this:
+
+	if (pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(32))) {
+		printk(KERN_WARNING
+		       "mydev: No suitable DMA available.\n");
+		goto ignore_this_device;
+	}
+
+Another common scenario is a 64-bit capable device.  The approach
+here is to try for 64-bit DAC addressing, but back down to a
+32-bit mask should that fail.  The PCI platform code may fail the
+64-bit mask not because the platform is not capable of 64-bit
+addressing.  Rather, it may fail in this case simply because
+32-bit SAC addressing is done more efficiently than DAC addressing.
+Sparc64 is one platform which behaves in this way.
+
+Here is how you would handle a 64-bit capable device which can drive
+all 64-bits when accessing streaming DMA:
+
+	int using_dac;
+
+	if (!pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(64))) {
+		using_dac = 1;
+	} else if (!pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(32))) {
+		using_dac = 0;
+	} else {
+		printk(KERN_WARNING
+		       "mydev: No suitable DMA available.\n");
+		goto ignore_this_device;
+	}
+
+If a card is capable of using 64-bit consistent allocations as well,
+the case would look like this:
+
+	int using_dac, consistent_using_dac;
+
+	if (!pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(64))) {
+		using_dac = 1;
+	   	consistent_using_dac = 1;
+		pci_set_consistent_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(64));
+	} else if (!pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(32))) {
+		using_dac = 0;
+		consistent_using_dac = 0;
+		pci_set_consistent_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(32));
+	} else {
+		printk(KERN_WARNING
+		       "mydev: No suitable DMA available.\n");
+		goto ignore_this_device;
+	}
+
+pci_set_consistent_dma_mask() will always be able to set the same or a
+smaller mask as pci_set_dma_mask(). However for the rare case that a
+device driver only uses consistent allocations, one would have to
+check the return value from pci_set_consistent_dma_mask().
+
+Finally, if your device can only drive the low 24-bits of
+address during PCI bus mastering you might do something like:
+
+	if (pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(24))) {
+		printk(KERN_WARNING
+		       "mydev: 24-bit DMA addressing not available.\n");
+		goto ignore_this_device;
+	}
+
+When pci_set_dma_mask() is successful, and returns zero, the PCI layer
+saves away this mask you have provided.  The PCI layer will use this
+information later when you make DMA mappings.
+
+There is a case which we are aware of at this time, which is worth
+mentioning in this documentation.  If your device supports multiple
+functions (for example a sound card provides playback and record
+functions) and the various different functions have _different_
+DMA addressing limitations, you may wish to probe each mask and
+only provide the functionality which the machine can handle.  It
+is important that the last call to pci_set_dma_mask() be for the
+most specific mask.
+
+Here is pseudo-code showing how this might be done:
+
+	#define PLAYBACK_ADDRESS_BITS	DMA_BIT_MASK(32)
+	#define RECORD_ADDRESS_BITS	DMA_BIT_MASK(24)
+
+	struct my_sound_card *card;
+	struct pci_dev *pdev;
+
+	...
+	if (!pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, PLAYBACK_ADDRESS_BITS)) {
+		card->playback_enabled = 1;
+	} else {
+		card->playback_enabled = 0;
+		printk(KERN_WARNING "%s: Playback disabled due to DMA limitations.\n",
+		       card->name);
+	}
+	if (!pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, RECORD_ADDRESS_BITS)) {
+		card->record_enabled = 1;
+	} else {
+		card->record_enabled = 0;
+		printk(KERN_WARNING "%s: Record disabled due to DMA limitations.\n",
+		       card->name);
+	}
+
+A sound card was used as an example here because this genre of PCI
+devices seems to be littered with ISA chips given a PCI front end,
+and thus retaining the 16MB DMA addressing limitations of ISA.
+
+			Types of DMA mappings
+
+There are two types of DMA mappings:
+
+- Consistent DMA mappings which are usually mapped at driver
+  initialization, unmapped at the end and for which the hardware should
+  guarantee that the device and the CPU can access the data
+  in parallel and will see updates made by each other without any
+  explicit software flushing.
+
+  Think of "consistent" as "synchronous" or "coherent".
+
+  The current default is to return consistent memory in the low 32
+  bits of the PCI bus space.  However, for future compatibility you
+  should set the consistent mask even if this default is fine for your
+  driver.
+
+  Good examples of what to use consistent mappings for are:
+
+	- Network card DMA ring descriptors.
+	- SCSI adapter mailbox command data structures.
+	- Device firmware microcode executed out of
+	  main memory.
+
+  The invariant these examples all require is that any CPU store
+  to memory is immediately visible to the device, and vice
+  versa.  Consistent mappings guarantee this.
+
+  IMPORTANT: Consistent DMA memory does not preclude the usage of
+             proper memory barriers.  The CPU may reorder stores to
+	     consistent memory just as it may normal memory.  Example:
+	     if it is important for the device to see the first word
+	     of a descriptor updated before the second, you must do
+	     something like:
+
+		desc->word0 = address;
+		wmb();
+		desc->word1 = DESC_VALID;
+
+             in order to get correct behavior on all platforms.
+
+	     Also, on some platforms your driver may need to flush CPU write
+	     buffers in much the same way as it needs to flush write buffers
+	     found in PCI bridges (such as by reading a register's value
+	     after writing it).
+
+- Streaming DMA mappings which are usually mapped for one DMA transfer,
+  unmapped right after it (unless you use pci_dma_sync_* below) and for which
+  hardware can optimize for sequential accesses.
+
+  This of "streaming" as "asynchronous" or "outside the coherency
+  domain".
+
+  Good examples of what to use streaming mappings for are:
+
+	- Networking buffers transmitted/received by a device.
+	- Filesystem buffers written/read by a SCSI device.
+
+  The interfaces for using this type of mapping were designed in
+  such a way that an implementation can make whatever performance
+  optimizations the hardware allows.  To this end, when using
+  such mappings you must be explicit about what you want to happen.
+
+Neither type of DMA mapping has alignment restrictions that come
+from PCI, although some devices may have such restrictions.
+Also, systems with caches that aren't DMA-coherent will work better
+when the underlying buffers don't share cache lines with other data.
+
+
+		 Using Consistent DMA mappings.
+
+To allocate and map large (PAGE_SIZE or so) consistent DMA regions,
+you should do:
+
+	dma_addr_t dma_handle;
+
+	cpu_addr = pci_alloc_consistent(pdev, size, &dma_handle);
+
+where pdev is a struct pci_dev *. This may be called in interrupt context.
+You should use dma_alloc_coherent (see DMA-API.txt) for buses
+where devices don't have struct pci_dev (like ISA, EISA).
+
+This argument is needed because the DMA translations may be bus
+specific (and often is private to the bus which the device is attached
+to).
+
+Size is the length of the region you want to allocate, in bytes.
+
+This routine will allocate RAM for that region, so it acts similarly to
+__get_free_pages (but takes size instead of a page order).  If your
+driver needs regions sized smaller than a page, you may prefer using
+the pci_pool interface, described below.
+
+The consistent DMA mapping interfaces, for non-NULL pdev, will by
+default return a DMA address which is SAC (Single Address Cycle)
+addressable.  Even if the device indicates (via PCI dma mask) that it
+may address the upper 32-bits and thus perform DAC cycles, consistent
+allocation will only return > 32-bit PCI addresses for DMA if the
+consistent dma mask has been explicitly changed via
+pci_set_consistent_dma_mask().  This is true of the pci_pool interface
+as well.
+
+pci_alloc_consistent returns two values: the virtual address which you
+can use to access it from the CPU and dma_handle which you pass to the
+card.
+
+The cpu return address and the DMA bus master address are both
+guaranteed to be aligned to the smallest PAGE_SIZE order which
+is greater than or equal to the requested size.  This invariant
+exists (for example) to guarantee that if you allocate a chunk
+which is smaller than or equal to 64 kilobytes, the extent of the
+buffer you receive will not cross a 64K boundary.
+
+To unmap and free such a DMA region, you call:
+
+	pci_free_consistent(pdev, size, cpu_addr, dma_handle);
+
+where pdev, size are the same as in the above call and cpu_addr and
+dma_handle are the values pci_alloc_consistent returned to you.
+This function may not be called in interrupt context.
+
+If your driver needs lots of smaller memory regions, you can write
+custom code to subdivide pages returned by pci_alloc_consistent,
+or you can use the pci_pool API to do that.  A pci_pool is like
+a kmem_cache, but it uses pci_alloc_consistent not __get_free_pages.
+Also, it understands common hardware constraints for alignment,
+like queue heads needing to be aligned on N byte boundaries.
+
+Create a pci_pool like this:
+
+	struct pci_pool *pool;
+
+	pool = pci_pool_create(name, pdev, size, align, alloc);
+
+The "name" is for diagnostics (like a kmem_cache name); pdev and size
+are as above.  The device's hardware alignment requirement for this
+type of data is "align" (which is expressed in bytes, and must be a
+power of two).  If your device has no boundary crossing restrictions,
+pass 0 for alloc; passing 4096 says memory allocated from this pool
+must not cross 4KByte boundaries (but at that time it may be better to
+go for pci_alloc_consistent directly instead).
+
+Allocate memory from a pci pool like this:
+
+	cpu_addr = pci_pool_alloc(pool, flags, &dma_handle);
+
+flags are SLAB_KERNEL if blocking is permitted (not in_interrupt nor
+holding SMP locks), SLAB_ATOMIC otherwise.  Like pci_alloc_consistent,
+this returns two values, cpu_addr and dma_handle.
+
+Free memory that was allocated from a pci_pool like this:
+
+	pci_pool_free(pool, cpu_addr, dma_handle);
+
+where pool is what you passed to pci_pool_alloc, and cpu_addr and
+dma_handle are the values pci_pool_alloc returned. This function
+may be called in interrupt context.
+
+Destroy a pci_pool by calling:
+
+	pci_pool_destroy(pool);
+
+Make sure you've called pci_pool_free for all memory allocated
+from a pool before you destroy the pool. This function may not
+be called in interrupt context.
+
+			DMA Direction
+
+The interfaces described in subsequent portions of this document
+take a DMA direction argument, which is an integer and takes on
+one of the following values:
+
+ PCI_DMA_BIDIRECTIONAL
+ PCI_DMA_TODEVICE
+ PCI_DMA_FROMDEVICE
+ PCI_DMA_NONE
+
+One should provide the exact DMA direction if you know it.
+
+PCI_DMA_TODEVICE means "from main memory to the PCI device"
+PCI_DMA_FROMDEVICE means "from the PCI device to main memory"
+It is the direction in which the data moves during the DMA
+transfer.
+
+You are _strongly_ encouraged to specify this as precisely
+as you possibly can.
+
+If you absolutely cannot know the direction of the DMA transfer,
+specify PCI_DMA_BIDIRECTIONAL.  It means that the DMA can go in
+either direction.  The platform guarantees that you may legally
+specify this, and that it will work, but this may be at the
+cost of performance for example.
+
+The value PCI_DMA_NONE is to be used for debugging.  One can
+hold this in a data structure before you come to know the
+precise direction, and this will help catch cases where your
+direction tracking logic has failed to set things up properly.
+
+Another advantage of specifying this value precisely (outside of
+potential platform-specific optimizations of such) is for debugging.
+Some platforms actually have a write permission boolean which DMA
+mappings can be marked with, much like page protections in the user
+program address space.  Such platforms can and do report errors in the
+kernel logs when the PCI controller hardware detects violation of the
+permission setting.
+
+Only streaming mappings specify a direction, consistent mappings
+implicitly have a direction attribute setting of
+PCI_DMA_BIDIRECTIONAL.
+
+The SCSI subsystem tells you the direction to use in the
+'sc_data_direction' member of the SCSI command your driver is
+working on.
+
+For Networking drivers, it's a rather simple affair.  For transmit
+packets, map/unmap them with the PCI_DMA_TODEVICE direction
+specifier.  For receive packets, just the opposite, map/unmap them
+with the PCI_DMA_FROMDEVICE direction specifier.
+
+		  Using Streaming DMA mappings
+
+The streaming DMA mapping routines can be called from interrupt
+context.  There are two versions of each map/unmap, one which will
+map/unmap a single memory region, and one which will map/unmap a
+scatterlist.
+
+To map a single region, you do:
+
+	struct pci_dev *pdev = mydev->pdev;
+	dma_addr_t dma_handle;
+	void *addr = buffer->ptr;
+	size_t size = buffer->len;
+
+	dma_handle = pci_map_single(pdev, addr, size, direction);
+
+and to unmap it:
+
+	pci_unmap_single(pdev, dma_handle, size, direction);
+
+You should call pci_unmap_single when the DMA activity is finished, e.g.
+from the interrupt which told you that the DMA transfer is done.
+
+Using cpu pointers like this for single mappings has a disadvantage,
+you cannot reference HIGHMEM memory in this way.  Thus, there is a
+map/unmap interface pair akin to pci_{map,unmap}_single.  These
+interfaces deal with page/offset pairs instead of cpu pointers.
+Specifically:
+
+	struct pci_dev *pdev = mydev->pdev;
+	dma_addr_t dma_handle;
+	struct page *page = buffer->page;
+	unsigned long offset = buffer->offset;
+	size_t size = buffer->len;
+
+	dma_handle = pci_map_page(pdev, page, offset, size, direction);
+
+	...
+
+	pci_unmap_page(pdev, dma_handle, size, direction);
+
+Here, "offset" means byte offset within the given page.
+
+With scatterlists, you map a region gathered from several regions by:
+
+	int i, count = pci_map_sg(pdev, sglist, nents, direction);
+	struct scatterlist *sg;
+
+	for_each_sg(sglist, sg, count, i) {
+		hw_address[i] = sg_dma_address(sg);
+		hw_len[i] = sg_dma_len(sg);
+	}
+
+where nents is the number of entries in the sglist.
+
+The implementation is free to merge several consecutive sglist entries
+into one (e.g. if DMA mapping is done with PAGE_SIZE granularity, any
+consecutive sglist entries can be merged into one provided the first one
+ends and the second one starts on a page boundary - in fact this is a huge
+advantage for cards which either cannot do scatter-gather or have very
+limited number of scatter-gather entries) and returns the actual number
+of sg entries it mapped them to. On failure 0 is returned.
+
+Then you should loop count times (note: this can be less than nents times)
+and use sg_dma_address() and sg_dma_len() macros where you previously
+accessed sg->address and sg->length as shown above.
+
+To unmap a scatterlist, just call:
+
+	pci_unmap_sg(pdev, sglist, nents, direction);
+
+Again, make sure DMA activity has already finished.
+
+PLEASE NOTE:  The 'nents' argument to the pci_unmap_sg call must be
+              the _same_ one you passed into the pci_map_sg call,
+	      it should _NOT_ be the 'count' value _returned_ from the
+              pci_map_sg call.
+
+Every pci_map_{single,sg} call should have its pci_unmap_{single,sg}
+counterpart, because the bus address space is a shared resource (although
+in some ports the mapping is per each BUS so less devices contend for the
+same bus address space) and you could render the machine unusable by eating
+all bus addresses.
+
+If you need to use the same streaming DMA region multiple times and touch
+the data in between the DMA transfers, the buffer needs to be synced
+properly in order for the cpu and device to see the most uptodate and
+correct copy of the DMA buffer.
+
+So, firstly, just map it with pci_map_{single,sg}, and after each DMA
+transfer call either:
+
+	pci_dma_sync_single_for_cpu(pdev, dma_handle, size, direction);
+
+or:
+
+	pci_dma_sync_sg_for_cpu(pdev, sglist, nents, direction);
+
+as appropriate.
+
+Then, if you wish to let the device get at the DMA area again,
+finish accessing the data with the cpu, and then before actually
+giving the buffer to the hardware call either:
+
+	pci_dma_sync_single_for_device(pdev, dma_handle, size, direction);
+
+or:
+
+	pci_dma_sync_sg_for_device(dev, sglist, nents, direction);
+
+as appropriate.
+
+After the last DMA transfer call one of the DMA unmap routines
+pci_unmap_{single,sg}. If you don't touch the data from the first pci_map_*
+call till pci_unmap_*, then you don't have to call the pci_dma_sync_*
+routines at all.
+
+Here is pseudo code which shows a situation in which you would need
+to use the pci_dma_sync_*() interfaces.
+
+	my_card_setup_receive_buffer(struct my_card *cp, char *buffer, int len)
+	{
+		dma_addr_t mapping;
+
+		mapping = pci_map_single(cp->pdev, buffer, len, PCI_DMA_FROMDEVICE);
+
+		cp->rx_buf = buffer;
+		cp->rx_len = len;
+		cp->rx_dma = mapping;
+
+		give_rx_buf_to_card(cp);
+	}
+
+	...
+
+	my_card_interrupt_handler(int irq, void *devid, struct pt_regs *regs)
+	{
+		struct my_card *cp = devid;
+
+		...
+		if (read_card_status(cp) == RX_BUF_TRANSFERRED) {
+			struct my_card_header *hp;
+
+			/* Examine the header to see if we wish
+			 * to accept the data.  But synchronize
+			 * the DMA transfer with the CPU first
+			 * so that we see updated contents.
+			 */
+			pci_dma_sync_single_for_cpu(cp->pdev, cp->rx_dma,
+						    cp->rx_len,
+						    PCI_DMA_FROMDEVICE);
+
+			/* Now it is safe to examine the buffer. */
+			hp = (struct my_card_header *) cp->rx_buf;
+			if (header_is_ok(hp)) {
+				pci_unmap_single(cp->pdev, cp->rx_dma, cp->rx_len,
+						 PCI_DMA_FROMDEVICE);
+				pass_to_upper_layers(cp->rx_buf);
+				make_and_setup_new_rx_buf(cp);
+			} else {
+				/* Just sync the buffer and give it back
+				 * to the card.
+				 */
+				pci_dma_sync_single_for_device(cp->pdev,
+							       cp->rx_dma,
+							       cp->rx_len,
+							       PCI_DMA_FROMDEVICE);
+				give_rx_buf_to_card(cp);
+			}
+		}
+	}
+
+Drivers converted fully to this interface should not use virt_to_bus any
+longer, nor should they use bus_to_virt. Some drivers have to be changed a
+little bit, because there is no longer an equivalent to bus_to_virt in the
+dynamic DMA mapping scheme - you have to always store the DMA addresses
+returned by the pci_alloc_consistent, pci_pool_alloc, and pci_map_single
+calls (pci_map_sg stores them in the scatterlist itself if the platform
+supports dynamic DMA mapping in hardware) in your driver structures and/or
+in the card registers.
+
+All PCI drivers should be using these interfaces with no exceptions.
+It is planned to completely remove virt_to_bus() and bus_to_virt() as
+they are entirely deprecated.  Some ports already do not provide these
+as it is impossible to correctly support them.
+
+		Optimizing Unmap State Space Consumption
+
+On many platforms, pci_unmap_{single,page}() is simply a nop.
+Therefore, keeping track of the mapping address and length is a waste
+of space.  Instead of filling your drivers up with ifdefs and the like
+to "work around" this (which would defeat the whole purpose of a
+portable API) the following facilities are provided.
+
+Actually, instead of describing the macros one by one, we'll
+transform some example code.
+
+1) Use DECLARE_PCI_UNMAP_{ADDR,LEN} in state saving structures.
+   Example, before:
+
+	struct ring_state {
+		struct sk_buff *skb;
+		dma_addr_t mapping;
+		__u32 len;
+	};
+
+   after:
+
+	struct ring_state {
+		struct sk_buff *skb;
+		DECLARE_PCI_UNMAP_ADDR(mapping)
+		DECLARE_PCI_UNMAP_LEN(len)
+	};
+
+   NOTE: DO NOT put a semicolon at the end of the DECLARE_*()
+         macro.
+
+2) Use pci_unmap_{addr,len}_set to set these values.
+   Example, before:
+
+	ringp->mapping = FOO;
+	ringp->len = BAR;
+
+   after:
+
+	pci_unmap_addr_set(ringp, mapping, FOO);
+	pci_unmap_len_set(ringp, len, BAR);
+
+3) Use pci_unmap_{addr,len} to access these values.
+   Example, before:
+
+	pci_unmap_single(pdev, ringp->mapping, ringp->len,
+			 PCI_DMA_FROMDEVICE);
+
+   after:
+
+	pci_unmap_single(pdev,
+			 pci_unmap_addr(ringp, mapping),
+			 pci_unmap_len(ringp, len),
+			 PCI_DMA_FROMDEVICE);
+
+It really should be self-explanatory.  We treat the ADDR and LEN
+separately, because it is possible for an implementation to only
+need the address in order to perform the unmap operation.
+
+			Platform Issues
+
+If you are just writing drivers for Linux and do not maintain
+an architecture port for the kernel, you can safely skip down
+to "Closing".
+
+1) Struct scatterlist requirements.
+
+   Struct scatterlist must contain, at a minimum, the following
+   members:
+
+	struct page *page;
+	unsigned int offset;
+	unsigned int length;
+
+   The base address is specified by a "page+offset" pair.
+
+   Previous versions of struct scatterlist contained a "void *address"
+   field that was sometimes used instead of page+offset.  As of Linux
+   2.5., page+offset is always used, and the "address" field has been
+   deleted.
+
+2) More to come...
+
+			Handling Errors
+
+DMA address space is limited on some architectures and an allocation
+failure can be determined by:
+
+- checking if pci_alloc_consistent returns NULL or pci_map_sg returns 0
+
+- checking the returned dma_addr_t of pci_map_single and pci_map_page
+  by using pci_dma_mapping_error():
+
+	dma_addr_t dma_handle;
+
+	dma_handle = pci_map_single(pdev, addr, size, direction);
+	if (pci_dma_mapping_error(pdev, dma_handle)) {
+		/*
+		 * reduce current DMA mapping usage,
+		 * delay and try again later or
+		 * reset driver.
+		 */
+	}
+
+			   Closing
+
+This document, and the API itself, would not be in it's current
+form without the feedback and suggestions from numerous individuals.
+We would like to specifically mention, in no particular order, the
+following people:
+
+	Russell King <rmk@....linux.org.uk>
+	Leo Dagum <dagum@...rel.engr.sgi.com>
+	Ralf Baechle <ralf@....sgi.com>
+	Grant Grundler <grundler@....hp.com>
+	Jay Estabrook <Jay.Estabrook@...paq.com>
+	Thomas Sailer <sailer@....ee.ethz.ch>
+	Andrea Arcangeli <andrea@...e.de>
+	Jens Axboe <jens.axboe@...cle.com>
+	David Mosberger-Tang <davidm@....hp.com>
--- linux-2.6.33-rc2-git4.orig/Documentation/block/biodoc.txt
+++ linux-2.6.33-rc2-git4/Documentation/block/biodoc.txt
@@ -186,7 +186,7 @@ a virtual address mapping (unlike the ea
 do not have a corresponding kernel virtual address space mapping) and
 low-memory pages.
 
-Note: Please refer to Documentation/DMA-mapping.txt for a discussion
+Note: Please refer to Documentation/PCI/PCI-DMA-mapping.txt for a discussion
 on PCI high mem DMA aspects and mapping of scatter gather lists, and support
 for 64 bit PCI.
 
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