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Date:	Mon, 16 May 2016 16:50:49 +0200
From:	Ingo Molnar <mingo@...nel.org>
To:	Linus Torvalds <torvalds@...ux-foundation.org>
Cc:	linux-kernel@...r.kernel.org,
	Peter Zijlstra <a.p.zijlstra@...llo.nl>,
	"Paul E. McKenney" <paulmck@...ibm.com>,
	Thomas Gleixner <tglx@...utronix.de>,
	Andrew Morton <akpm@...ux-foundation.org>
Subject: [GIT PULL] locking changes for v4.7

Linus,

Please pull the latest locking-core-for-linus git tree from:

   git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/tip/tip.git locking-core-for-linus

   # HEAD: a1cc5bcfcfca0b99f009b117785142dbdc3b87a3 locking/atomics: Flip atomic_fetch_or() arguments

The main changes in this cycle were:

 - pvqspinlock statistics fixes (Davidlohr Bueso)

 - flip atomic_fetch_or() arguments (Peter Zijlstra)

 - locktorture simplification (Paul E. McKenney)

 - documentation updates (SeongJae Park, David Howells, Davidlohr Bueso,
                          Paul E. McKenney, Peter Zijlstra, Will Deacon)

 - various fixes


 Thanks,

	Ingo

------------------>
David Howells (1):
      locking/Documentation: State purpose of memory-barriers.txt

Davidlohr Bueso (5):
      locking/Documentation: Mention smp_cond_acquire()
      locking/locktorture: Fix deboosting NULL pointer dereference
      locking/locktorture: Fix NULL pointer dereference for cleanup paths
      locking/pvqspinlock: Avoid double resetting of stats
      locking/pvqspinlock: Robustify init_qspinlock_stat()

Denys Vlasenko (1):
      locking/lockdep: Deinline register_lock_class(), save 2328 bytes

Eric Engestrom (1):
      locking/Documentation/lockdep: Fix spelling mistakes

Paul E. McKenney (2):
      locking/Documentation: Clarify relationship of barrier() to control dependencies
      lcoking/locktorture: Simplify the torture_runnable computation

Peter Zijlstra (2):
      locking/Documentation: Add disclaimer
      locking/atomics: Flip atomic_fetch_or() arguments

SeongJae Park (4):
      locking/Documentation: Fix missed s/lock/acquire renames
      locking/Documentation: Add missed subsection in TOC
      locking/Documentation: Fix formatting inconsistencies
      locking/Documentation: Insert white spaces consistently

Will Deacon (1):
      locking/Documentation: Clarify that ACQUIRE applies to loads, RELEASE applies to stores


 Documentation/locking/lockdep-design.txt |   4 +-
 Documentation/memory-barriers.txt        | 117 +++++++++++++++++++++----------
 include/linux/atomic.h                   |   4 +-
 kernel/locking/lockdep.c                 |   2 +-
 kernel/locking/locktorture.c             |  25 ++++---
 kernel/locking/qspinlock_stat.h          |  24 ++++---
 kernel/time/tick-sched.c                 |   4 +-
 7 files changed, 117 insertions(+), 63 deletions(-)

diff --git a/Documentation/locking/lockdep-design.txt b/Documentation/locking/lockdep-design.txt
index 5001280e9d82..9de1c158d44c 100644
--- a/Documentation/locking/lockdep-design.txt
+++ b/Documentation/locking/lockdep-design.txt
@@ -97,7 +97,7 @@ Furthermore, the following usage based lock dependencies are not allowed
    <hardirq-safe>   ->  <hardirq-unsafe>
    <softirq-safe>   ->  <softirq-unsafe>
 
-The first rule comes from the fact the a hardirq-safe lock could be
+The first rule comes from the fact that a hardirq-safe lock could be
 taken by a hardirq context, interrupting a hardirq-unsafe lock - and
 thus could result in a lock inversion deadlock. Likewise, a softirq-safe
 lock could be taken by an softirq context, interrupting a softirq-unsafe
@@ -220,7 +220,7 @@ calculated, which hash is unique for every lock chain. The hash value,
 when the chain is validated for the first time, is then put into a hash
 table, which hash-table can be checked in a lockfree manner. If the
 locking chain occurs again later on, the hash table tells us that we
-dont have to validate the chain again.
+don't have to validate the chain again.
 
 Troubleshooting:
 ----------------
diff --git a/Documentation/memory-barriers.txt b/Documentation/memory-barriers.txt
index 3729cbe60e41..147ae8ec836f 100644
--- a/Documentation/memory-barriers.txt
+++ b/Documentation/memory-barriers.txt
@@ -4,8 +4,40 @@
 
 By: David Howells <dhowells@...hat.com>
     Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@...ux.vnet.ibm.com>
+    Will Deacon <will.deacon@....com>
+    Peter Zijlstra <peterz@...radead.org>
 
-Contents:
+==========
+DISCLAIMER
+==========
+
+This document is not a specification; it is intentionally (for the sake of
+brevity) and unintentionally (due to being human) incomplete. This document is
+meant as a guide to using the various memory barriers provided by Linux, but
+in case of any doubt (and there are many) please ask.
+
+To repeat, this document is not a specification of what Linux expects from
+hardware.
+
+The purpose of this document is twofold:
+
+ (1) to specify the minimum functionality that one can rely on for any
+     particular barrier, and
+
+ (2) to provide a guide as to how to use the barriers that are available.
+
+Note that an architecture can provide more than the minimum requirement
+for any particular barrier, but if the architecure provides less than
+that, that architecture is incorrect.
+
+Note also that it is possible that a barrier may be a no-op for an
+architecture because the way that arch works renders an explicit barrier
+unnecessary in that case.
+
+
+========
+CONTENTS
+========
 
  (*) Abstract memory access model.
 
@@ -31,15 +63,15 @@ By: David Howells <dhowells@...hat.com>
 
  (*) Implicit kernel memory barriers.
 
-     - Locking functions.
+     - Lock acquisition functions.
      - Interrupt disabling functions.
      - Sleep and wake-up functions.
      - Miscellaneous functions.
 
- (*) Inter-CPU locking barrier effects.
+ (*) Inter-CPU acquiring barrier effects.
 
-     - Locks vs memory accesses.
-     - Locks vs I/O accesses.
+     - Acquires vs memory accesses.
+     - Acquires vs I/O accesses.
 
  (*) Where are memory barriers needed?
 
@@ -61,6 +93,7 @@ By: David Howells <dhowells@...hat.com>
  (*) The things CPUs get up to.
 
      - And then there's the Alpha.
+     - Virtual Machine Guests.
 
  (*) Example uses.
 
@@ -148,7 +181,7 @@ committed.
 
 	CPU 1		CPU 2
 	===============	===============
-	{ A == 1, B == 2, C = 3, P == &A, Q == &C }
+	{ A == 1, B == 2, C == 3, P == &A, Q == &C }
 	B = 4;		Q = P;
 	P = &B		D = *Q;
 
@@ -430,8 +463,9 @@ VARIETIES OF MEMORY BARRIER
      This acts as a one-way permeable barrier.  It guarantees that all memory
      operations after the ACQUIRE operation will appear to happen after the
      ACQUIRE operation with respect to the other components of the system.
-     ACQUIRE operations include LOCK operations and smp_load_acquire()
-     operations.
+     ACQUIRE operations include LOCK operations and both smp_load_acquire()
+     and smp_cond_acquire() operations. The later builds the necessary ACQUIRE
+     semantics from relying on a control dependency and smp_rmb().
 
      Memory operations that occur before an ACQUIRE operation may appear to
      happen after it completes.
@@ -464,6 +498,11 @@ VARIETIES OF MEMORY BARRIER
      This means that ACQUIRE acts as a minimal "acquire" operation and
      RELEASE acts as a minimal "release" operation.
 
+A subset of the atomic operations described in atomic_ops.txt have ACQUIRE
+and RELEASE variants in addition to fully-ordered and relaxed (no barrier
+semantics) definitions.  For compound atomics performing both a load and a
+store, ACQUIRE semantics apply only to the load and RELEASE semantics apply
+only to the store portion of the operation.
 
 Memory barriers are only required where there's a possibility of interaction
 between two CPUs or between a CPU and a device.  If it can be guaranteed that
@@ -517,7 +556,7 @@ it's not always obvious that they're needed.  To illustrate, consider the
 
 	CPU 1		      CPU 2
 	===============	      ===============
-	{ A == 1, B == 2, C = 3, P == &A, Q == &C }
+	{ A == 1, B == 2, C == 3, P == &A, Q == &C }
 	B = 4;
 	<write barrier>
 	WRITE_ONCE(P, &B)
@@ -544,7 +583,7 @@ To deal with this, a data dependency barrier or better must be inserted
 
 	CPU 1		      CPU 2
 	===============	      ===============
-	{ A == 1, B == 2, C = 3, P == &A, Q == &C }
+	{ A == 1, B == 2, C == 3, P == &A, Q == &C }
 	B = 4;
 	<write barrier>
 	WRITE_ONCE(P, &B);
@@ -813,9 +852,10 @@ site: https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~pes20/ppcmem/index.html.
       the same variable, then those stores must be ordered, either by
       preceding both of them with smp_mb() or by using smp_store_release()
       to carry out the stores.  Please note that it is -not- sufficient
-      to use barrier() at beginning of each leg of the "if" statement,
-      as optimizing compilers do not necessarily respect barrier()
-      in this case.
+      to use barrier() at beginning of each leg of the "if" statement
+      because, as shown by the example above, optimizing compilers can
+      destroy the control dependency while respecting the letter of the
+      barrier() law.
 
   (*) Control dependencies require at least one run-time conditional
       between the prior load and the subsequent store, and this
@@ -1731,15 +1771,15 @@ CPU MEMORY BARRIERS
 
 
 All memory barriers except the data dependency barriers imply a compiler
-barrier. Data dependencies do not impose any additional compiler ordering.
+barrier.  Data dependencies do not impose any additional compiler ordering.
 
 Aside: In the case of data dependencies, the compiler would be expected
 to issue the loads in the correct order (eg. `a[b]` would have to load
 the value of b before loading a[b]), however there is no guarantee in
 the C specification that the compiler may not speculate the value of b
 (eg. is equal to 1) and load a before b (eg. tmp = a[1]; if (b != 1)
-tmp = a[b]; ). There is also the problem of a compiler reloading b after
-having loaded a[b], thus having a newer copy of b than a[b]. A consensus
+tmp = a[b]; ).  There is also the problem of a compiler reloading b after
+having loaded a[b], thus having a newer copy of b than a[b].  A consensus
 has not yet been reached about these problems, however the READ_ONCE()
 macro is a good place to start looking.
 
@@ -1794,6 +1834,7 @@ compiler and the CPU from reordering them.
 
 
  (*) lockless_dereference();
+
      This can be thought of as a pointer-fetch wrapper around the
      smp_read_barrier_depends() data-dependency barrier.
 
@@ -1858,7 +1899,7 @@ This is a variation on the mandatory write barrier that causes writes to weakly
 ordered I/O regions to be partially ordered.  Its effects may go beyond the
 CPU->Hardware interface and actually affect the hardware at some level.
 
-See the subsection "Locks vs I/O accesses" for more information.
+See the subsection "Acquires vs I/O accesses" for more information.
 
 
 ===============================
@@ -1873,8 +1914,8 @@ provide more substantial guarantees, but these may not be relied upon outside
 of arch specific code.
 
 
-ACQUIRING FUNCTIONS
--------------------
+LOCK ACQUISITION FUNCTIONS
+--------------------------
 
 The Linux kernel has a number of locking constructs:
 
@@ -1895,7 +1936,7 @@ In all cases there are variants on "ACQUIRE" operations and "RELEASE" operations
      Memory operations issued before the ACQUIRE may be completed after
      the ACQUIRE operation has completed.  An smp_mb__before_spinlock(),
      combined with a following ACQUIRE, orders prior stores against
-     subsequent loads and stores. Note that this is weaker than smp_mb()!
+     subsequent loads and stores.  Note that this is weaker than smp_mb()!
      The smp_mb__before_spinlock() primitive is free on many architectures.
 
  (2) RELEASE operation implication:
@@ -2090,9 +2131,9 @@ The whole sequence above is available in various canned forms, all of which
 	event_indicated = 1;
 	wake_up_process(event_daemon);
 
-A write memory barrier is implied by wake_up() and co. if and only if they wake
-something up.  The barrier occurs before the task state is cleared, and so sits
-between the STORE to indicate the event and the STORE to set TASK_RUNNING:
+A write memory barrier is implied by wake_up() and co.  if and only if they
+wake something up.  The barrier occurs before the task state is cleared, and so
+sits between the STORE to indicate the event and the STORE to set TASK_RUNNING:
 
 	CPU 1				CPU 2
 	===============================	===============================
@@ -2206,7 +2247,7 @@ Consider the following: the system has a pair of spinlocks (M) and (Q), and
 
 Then there is no guarantee as to what order CPU 3 will see the accesses to *A
 through *H occur in, other than the constraints imposed by the separate locks
-on the separate CPUs. It might, for example, see:
+on the separate CPUs.  It might, for example, see:
 
 	*E, ACQUIRE M, ACQUIRE Q, *G, *C, *F, *A, *B, RELEASE Q, *D, *H, RELEASE M
 
@@ -2486,9 +2527,9 @@ barriers are needed or not.
 	clear_bit_unlock();
 	__clear_bit_unlock();
 
-These implement ACQUIRE-class and RELEASE-class operations. These should be used in
-preference to other operations when implementing locking primitives, because
-their implementations can be optimised on many architectures.
+These implement ACQUIRE-class and RELEASE-class operations.  These should be
+used in preference to other operations when implementing locking primitives,
+because their implementations can be optimised on many architectures.
 
 [!] Note that special memory barrier primitives are available for these
 situations because on some CPUs the atomic instructions used imply full memory
@@ -2568,12 +2609,12 @@ explicit barriers are used.
 
 Normally this won't be a problem because the I/O accesses done inside such
 sections will include synchronous load operations on strictly ordered I/O
-registers that form implicit I/O barriers. If this isn't sufficient then an
+registers that form implicit I/O barriers.  If this isn't sufficient then an
 mmiowb() may need to be used explicitly.
 
 
 A similar situation may occur between an interrupt routine and two routines
-running on separate CPUs that communicate with each other. If such a case is
+running on separate CPUs that communicate with each other.  If such a case is
 likely, then interrupt-disabling locks should be used to guarantee ordering.
 
 
@@ -2587,8 +2628,8 @@ When accessing I/O memory, drivers should use the appropriate accessor
  (*) inX(), outX():
 
      These are intended to talk to I/O space rather than memory space, but
-     that's primarily a CPU-specific concept. The i386 and x86_64 processors do
-     indeed have special I/O space access cycles and instructions, but many
+     that's primarily a CPU-specific concept.  The i386 and x86_64 processors
+     do indeed have special I/O space access cycles and instructions, but many
      CPUs don't have such a concept.
 
      The PCI bus, amongst others, defines an I/O space concept which - on such
@@ -2610,7 +2651,7 @@ When accessing I/O memory, drivers should use the appropriate accessor
 
      Whether these are guaranteed to be fully ordered and uncombined with
      respect to each other on the issuing CPU depends on the characteristics
-     defined for the memory window through which they're accessing. On later
+     defined for the memory window through which they're accessing.  On later
      i386 architecture machines, for example, this is controlled by way of the
      MTRR registers.
 
@@ -2635,10 +2676,10 @@ When accessing I/O memory, drivers should use the appropriate accessor
  (*) readX_relaxed(), writeX_relaxed()
 
      These are similar to readX() and writeX(), but provide weaker memory
-     ordering guarantees. Specifically, they do not guarantee ordering with
+     ordering guarantees.  Specifically, they do not guarantee ordering with
      respect to normal memory accesses (e.g. DMA buffers) nor do they guarantee
-     ordering with respect to LOCK or UNLOCK operations. If the latter is
-     required, an mmiowb() barrier can be used. Note that relaxed accesses to
+     ordering with respect to LOCK or UNLOCK operations.  If the latter is
+     required, an mmiowb() barrier can be used.  Note that relaxed accesses to
      the same peripheral are guaranteed to be ordered with respect to each
      other.
 
@@ -3040,8 +3081,9 @@ The Alpha defines the Linux kernel's memory barrier model.
 
 See the subsection on "Cache Coherency" above.
 
+
 VIRTUAL MACHINE GUESTS
--------------------
+----------------------
 
 Guests running within virtual machines might be affected by SMP effects even if
 the guest itself is compiled without SMP support.  This is an artifact of
@@ -3050,7 +3092,7 @@ barriers for this use-case would be possible but is often suboptimal.
 
 To handle this case optimally, low-level virt_mb() etc macros are available.
 These have the same effect as smp_mb() etc when SMP is enabled, but generate
-identical code for SMP and non-SMP systems. For example, virtual machine guests
+identical code for SMP and non-SMP systems.  For example, virtual machine guests
 should use virt_mb() rather than smp_mb() when synchronizing against a
 (possibly SMP) host.
 
@@ -3058,6 +3100,7 @@ These are equivalent to smp_mb() etc counterparts in all other respects,
 in particular, they do not control MMIO effects: to control
 MMIO effects, use mandatory barriers.
 
+
 ============
 EXAMPLE USES
 ============
diff --git a/include/linux/atomic.h b/include/linux/atomic.h
index 506c3531832e..e451534fe54d 100644
--- a/include/linux/atomic.h
+++ b/include/linux/atomic.h
@@ -560,11 +560,11 @@ static inline int atomic_dec_if_positive(atomic_t *v)
 
 /**
  * atomic_fetch_or - perform *p |= mask and return old value of *p
- * @p: pointer to atomic_t
  * @mask: mask to OR on the atomic_t
+ * @p: pointer to atomic_t
  */
 #ifndef atomic_fetch_or
-static inline int atomic_fetch_or(atomic_t *p, int mask)
+static inline int atomic_fetch_or(int mask, atomic_t *p)
 {
 	int old, val = atomic_read(p);
 
diff --git a/kernel/locking/lockdep.c b/kernel/locking/lockdep.c
index 78c1c0ee6dc1..874d53eaf389 100644
--- a/kernel/locking/lockdep.c
+++ b/kernel/locking/lockdep.c
@@ -708,7 +708,7 @@ look_up_lock_class(struct lockdep_map *lock, unsigned int subclass)
  * yet. Otherwise we look it up. We cache the result in the lock object
  * itself, so actual lookup of the hash should be once per lock object.
  */
-static inline struct lock_class *
+static struct lock_class *
 register_lock_class(struct lockdep_map *lock, unsigned int subclass, int force)
 {
 	struct lockdep_subclass_key *key;
diff --git a/kernel/locking/locktorture.c b/kernel/locking/locktorture.c
index 8ef1919d63b2..f8c5af52a131 100644
--- a/kernel/locking/locktorture.c
+++ b/kernel/locking/locktorture.c
@@ -75,12 +75,7 @@ struct lock_stress_stats {
 	long n_lock_acquired;
 };
 
-#if defined(MODULE)
-#define LOCKTORTURE_RUNNABLE_INIT 1
-#else
-#define LOCKTORTURE_RUNNABLE_INIT 0
-#endif
-int torture_runnable = LOCKTORTURE_RUNNABLE_INIT;
+int torture_runnable = IS_ENABLED(MODULE);
 module_param(torture_runnable, int, 0444);
 MODULE_PARM_DESC(torture_runnable, "Start locktorture at module init");
 
@@ -394,12 +389,12 @@ static void torture_rtmutex_boost(struct torture_random_state *trsp)
 
 	if (!rt_task(current)) {
 		/*
-		 * (1) Boost priority once every ~50k operations. When the
+		 * Boost priority once every ~50k operations. When the
 		 * task tries to take the lock, the rtmutex it will account
 		 * for the new priority, and do any corresponding pi-dance.
 		 */
-		if (!(torture_random(trsp) %
-		      (cxt.nrealwriters_stress * factor))) {
+		if (trsp && !(torture_random(trsp) %
+			      (cxt.nrealwriters_stress * factor))) {
 			policy = SCHED_FIFO;
 			param.sched_priority = MAX_RT_PRIO - 1;
 		} else /* common case, do nothing */
@@ -748,6 +743,15 @@ static void lock_torture_cleanup(void)
 	if (torture_cleanup_begin())
 		return;
 
+	/*
+	 * Indicates early cleanup, meaning that the test has not run,
+	 * such as when passing bogus args when loading the module. As
+	 * such, only perform the underlying torture-specific cleanups,
+	 * and avoid anything related to locktorture.
+	 */
+	if (!cxt.lwsa)
+		goto end;
+
 	if (writer_tasks) {
 		for (i = 0; i < cxt.nrealwriters_stress; i++)
 			torture_stop_kthread(lock_torture_writer,
@@ -776,6 +780,7 @@ static void lock_torture_cleanup(void)
 	else
 		lock_torture_print_module_parms(cxt.cur_ops,
 						"End of test: SUCCESS");
+end:
 	torture_cleanup_end();
 }
 
@@ -870,6 +875,7 @@ static int __init lock_torture_init(void)
 			VERBOSE_TOROUT_STRING("cxt.lrsa: Out of memory");
 			firsterr = -ENOMEM;
 			kfree(cxt.lwsa);
+			cxt.lwsa = NULL;
 			goto unwind;
 		}
 
@@ -878,6 +884,7 @@ static int __init lock_torture_init(void)
 			cxt.lrsa[i].n_lock_acquired = 0;
 		}
 	}
+
 	lock_torture_print_module_parms(cxt.cur_ops, "Start of test");
 
 	/* Prepare torture context. */
diff --git a/kernel/locking/qspinlock_stat.h b/kernel/locking/qspinlock_stat.h
index d734b7502001..22e025309845 100644
--- a/kernel/locking/qspinlock_stat.h
+++ b/kernel/locking/qspinlock_stat.h
@@ -191,8 +191,6 @@ static ssize_t qstat_write(struct file *file, const char __user *user_buf,
 
 		for (i = 0 ; i < qstat_num; i++)
 			WRITE_ONCE(ptr[i], 0);
-		for (i = 0 ; i < qstat_num; i++)
-			WRITE_ONCE(ptr[i], 0);
 	}
 	return count;
 }
@@ -214,10 +212,8 @@ static int __init init_qspinlock_stat(void)
 	struct dentry *d_qstat = debugfs_create_dir("qlockstat", NULL);
 	int i;
 
-	if (!d_qstat) {
-		pr_warn("Could not create 'qlockstat' debugfs directory\n");
-		return 0;
-	}
+	if (!d_qstat)
+		goto out;
 
 	/*
 	 * Create the debugfs files
@@ -227,12 +223,20 @@ static int __init init_qspinlock_stat(void)
 	 * performance.
 	 */
 	for (i = 0; i < qstat_num; i++)
-		debugfs_create_file(qstat_names[i], 0400, d_qstat,
-				   (void *)(long)i, &fops_qstat);
+		if (!debugfs_create_file(qstat_names[i], 0400, d_qstat,
+					 (void *)(long)i, &fops_qstat))
+			goto fail_undo;
+
+	if (!debugfs_create_file(qstat_names[qstat_reset_cnts], 0200, d_qstat,
+				 (void *)(long)qstat_reset_cnts, &fops_qstat))
+		goto fail_undo;
 
-	debugfs_create_file(qstat_names[qstat_reset_cnts], 0200, d_qstat,
-			   (void *)(long)qstat_reset_cnts, &fops_qstat);
 	return 0;
+fail_undo:
+	debugfs_remove_recursive(d_qstat);
+out:
+	pr_warn("Could not create 'qlockstat' debugfs entries\n");
+	return -ENOMEM;
 }
 fs_initcall(init_qspinlock_stat);
 
diff --git a/kernel/time/tick-sched.c b/kernel/time/tick-sched.c
index 58e3310c9b21..3daa49ff0719 100644
--- a/kernel/time/tick-sched.c
+++ b/kernel/time/tick-sched.c
@@ -262,7 +262,7 @@ static void tick_nohz_dep_set_all(atomic_t *dep,
 {
 	int prev;
 
-	prev = atomic_fetch_or(dep, BIT(bit));
+	prev = atomic_fetch_or(BIT(bit), dep);
 	if (!prev)
 		tick_nohz_full_kick_all();
 }
@@ -292,7 +292,7 @@ void tick_nohz_dep_set_cpu(int cpu, enum tick_dep_bits bit)
 
 	ts = per_cpu_ptr(&tick_cpu_sched, cpu);
 
-	prev = atomic_fetch_or(&ts->tick_dep_mask, BIT(bit));
+	prev = atomic_fetch_or(BIT(bit), &ts->tick_dep_mask);
 	if (!prev) {
 		preempt_disable();
 		/* Perf needs local kick that is NMI safe */

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