lists.openwall.net   lists  /  announce  owl-users  owl-dev  john-users  john-dev  passwdqc-users  yescrypt  popa3d-users  /  oss-security  kernel-hardening  musl  sabotage  tlsify  passwords  /  crypt-dev  xvendor  /  Bugtraq  Full-Disclosure  linux-kernel  linux-netdev  linux-ext4  linux-hardening  linux-cve-announce  PHC 
Open Source and information security mailing list archives
 
Hash Suite: Windows password security audit tool. GUI, reports in PDF.
[<prev] [next>] [<thread-prev] [thread-next>] [day] [month] [year] [list]
Date:   Wed, 6 Dec 2017 12:01:04 -0600
From:   Tom Gall <tom.gall@...aro.org>
To:     Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@...uxfoundation.org>
Cc:     linux-kernel@...r.kernel.org, torvalds@...ux-foundation.org,
        akpm@...ux-foundation.org, Guenter Roeck <linux@...ck-us.net>,
        shuahkh@....samsung.com, patches@...nelci.org,
        ben.hutchings@...ethink.co.uk, lkft-triage@...ts.linaro.org,
        linux- stable <stable@...r.kernel.org>
Subject: Re: [PATCH 4.14 00/95] 4.14.4-stable review



> On Dec 6, 2017, at 12:49 AM, Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@...uxfoundation.org> wrote:
> 
> On Tue, Dec 05, 2017 at 03:45:07PM -0600, Tom Gall wrote:
>> 
>> 
>>> On Dec 5, 2017, at 12:24 AM, Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@...uxfoundation.org> wrote:
>>> 
>>> On Mon, Dec 04, 2017 at 03:12:45PM -0600, Tom Gall wrote:
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>>> On Dec 4, 2017, at 9:59 AM, Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@...uxfoundation.org> wrote:
>>>>> 
>>>>> This is the start of the stable review cycle for the 4.14.4 release.
>>>>> There are 95 patches in this series, all will be posted as a response
>>>>> to this one.  If anyone has any issues with these being applied, please
>>>>> let me know.
>>>>> 
>>>>> Responses should be made by Wed Dec  6 16:00:27 UTC 2017.
>>>>> Anything received after that time might be too late.
>>>>> 
>>>>> The whole patch series can be found in one patch at:
>>>>> 	kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/v4.x/stable-review/patch-4.14.4-rc1.gz
>>>>> or in the git tree and branch at:
>>>>> git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable-rc.git linux-4.14.y
>>>>> and the diffstat can be found below.
>>>>> 
>>>>> thanks,
>>>>> 
>>>>> greg k-h
>>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> Compiled, booted and ran the following package unit tests without regressions on x86_64
>>>> 
>>>> boringssl : 
>>>>  go test target:0/0/5764/5764/5764 PASS
>>>>  ssl_test : 10 pass
>>>>  crypto_test : 28 pass
>>>> e2fsprogs:
>>>>  make check : 340 pass
>>>> sqlite
>>>>  make test : 143914 pass
>>>> drm
>>>>  make check : 15 pass
>>>>  modetest, drmdevice : pass
>>>> alsa-lib
>>>>  make check : 2 pass
>>>> bluez
>>>>  make check : 25 pass
>>>> libusb
>>>>  stress : 4 pass
>>> 
>>> How do the above tests stress the kernel?
>> 
>> Depends entirely on the package in question.
>> 
>> Sure, of completely no surprise a lot of package unit tests don’t really 
>> do much that’s particularly interesting save to the package itself.
> 
> Then why run those tests?  Like sqlite, what kernel functionality does
> that exercise that ltp does not?

Simply it beats on the system. 

>> There are sometimes an interesting subset that drives some amount of work in kernel. 
>> That’s the useful stuff.
> 
> Is that true with the above list?  If so, why are those types of tests
> not part of any kernel test suite that I have seen before?

Dunno. Can’t comment on the non-action by others. What we can do is either
harvest (by adding to say LTP) or improve in the 

> 
>> Take bluez, and it’s use of CONFIG_CRYPTO_USER_API.  
> 
> Nice, does that cover things that is not in LTP?  Should those tests be
> added to LTP?
> 
>>> Aren't they just
>>> verifications that the source code in the package is correct?
>> 
>> So if there’s some useful subset, that’s what I’m looking for.
>> 
>>> I guess it proves something, but have you ever seen the above regress in
>>> _any_ kernel release?
>> 
>> Past regressions make for a good test. 
> 
> You are testing past regressions of the userspace code, not the kernel
> here.  Why do I care about that?  :)

Like you, I only care things that are testing the kernel. I’m lazy.  I’m not
chopping out the things that go far afield, besides it’s not broken nor is it
hurting anything.

> Don't fall down the trap of running code for the sake of running code
> (i.e. like that web site that starts with a P) that doesn't actually
> test anything that actually matters.

Yup entirely agree. No emerge world going on here. 8-b

> thanks,
> 
> greg k-h

Powered by blists - more mailing lists