lists.openwall.net   lists  /  announce  owl-users  owl-dev  john-users  john-dev  passwdqc-users  yescrypt  popa3d-users  /  oss-security  kernel-hardening  musl  sabotage  tlsify  passwords  /  crypt-dev  xvendor  /  Bugtraq  Full-Disclosure  linux-kernel  linux-netdev  linux-ext4  PHC 
Open Source and information security mailing list archives
 
Hash Suite: Windows password security audit tool. GUI, reports in PDF.
[<prev] [next>] [<thread-prev] [thread-next>] [day] [month] [year] [list]
Date:   Wed, 13 Feb 2019 16:52:49 +0800
From:   xiang xiao <xiaoxiang781216@...il.com>
To:     Sergey Senozhatsky <sergey.senozhatsky.work@...il.com>
Cc:     Steven Rostedt <rostedt@...dmis.org>,
        Petr Mladek <pmladek@...e.com>,
        Sergey Senozhatsky <sergey.senozhatsky@...il.com>,
        linux-kernel@...r.kernel.org, Xiang Xiao <xiaoxiang@...omi.com>
Subject: Re: [PATCH] printk: add KERN_NOTIME to skip the timestamp

On Wed, Feb 13, 2019 at 4:08 PM Sergey Senozhatsky
<sergey.senozhatsky.work@...il.com> wrote:
>
> On (02/13/19 15:14), xiang xiao wrote:
> >
> > But how can I precisely control timestamp on/off per message
> > through sysfs node?
> >
>
> Hmm. I don't know how many kernel printk-s you have and how often
> do you write to kmsg.

It depend on use case, but I plan to create a generic driver which
could reuse by all rpmsg based remoteproc.
This is the driver for upstream:
https://github.com/thesofproject/linux/pull/177/commits/a0b7009fede5552dc98733f2996a8140bff62455
so we need more precisely control here.

> I was thinking about something like this:
>

>         echo 0 > /...printk.../time
>         dump buffer to /dev/kmsg
>         echo 1 > /...printk../time
>

Another problem is how to control sysfs node from driver code
naturally, the concurrency and global side effect also need to
address.

> - If you would have several kernel printk-s in the meantime, then
>   those would not have timestamps, but you kinda can roughly guess
>   it
>
>         write [1243] foo > /dev/kmsg
>         write [1244] foo > /dev/kmsg
>                 << printk(bar)               <timestamp ~[1244,1245]>
>         write [1245] foo > /dev/kmsg
>
> Maybe this won't suffice.
>
>         -ss

Powered by blists - more mailing lists