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Date:   Mon, 18 Feb 2019 01:26:20 +0000
From:   "Yang, Shunyong" <shunyong.yang@...-semitech.com>
To:     Christoph Hellwig <hch@....de>,
        "David S. Miller" <davem@...emloft.net>,
        Helge Deller <deller@....de>
CC:     "linux-parisc@...r.kernel.org" <linux-parisc@...r.kernel.org>,
        "linux-doc@...r.kernel.org" <linux-doc@...r.kernel.org>,
        "linux-kernel@...r.kernel.org" <linux-kernel@...r.kernel.org>,
        "iommu@...ts.linux-foundation.org" <iommu@...ts.linux-foundation.org>,
        "sparclinux@...r.kernel.org" <sparclinux@...r.kernel.org>,
        Robin Murphy <robin.murphy@....com>
Subject: Re: [PATCH 5/5] Documentation/DMA-API-HOWTO: update dma_mask sections

Hi, Christoph,

On 2019/2/15 22:46, Christoph Hellwig wrote:
> We don't require drivers to guess a DMA mask that might actually
> match the system capabilities any more, so fix up the documentation
> to clear this up.
> 
> Signed-off-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@....de>
> ---
>  Documentation/DMA-API-HOWTO.txt | 121 +++++++++++---------------------
>  1 file changed, 41 insertions(+), 80 deletions(-)
> 
> diff --git a/Documentation/DMA-API-HOWTO.txt b/Documentation/DMA-API-HOWTO.txt
> index f0cc3f772265..8e948fae34af 100644
> --- a/Documentation/DMA-API-HOWTO.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/DMA-API-HOWTO.txt
> @@ -146,114 +146,75 @@ What about block I/O and networking buffers?  The block I/O and
>  networking subsystems make sure that the buffers they use are valid
>  for you to DMA from/to.
>  
> -DMA addressing limitations
> +DMA addressing capabilities
>  ==========================
>  
> -Does your device have any DMA addressing limitations?  For example, is
> -your device only capable of driving the low order 24-bits of address?
> -If so, you need to inform the kernel of this fact.
> +By default, the kernel assumes that your device can address 32-bits of DMA
> +addressing.  For a 64-bit capable device, this needs to be increased, and for
> +a device with limitations, it needs to be decreased.
>  
> -By default, the kernel assumes that your device can address the full
> -32-bits.  For a 64-bit capable device, this needs to be increased.
> -And for a device with limitations, as discussed in the previous
> -paragraph, it needs to be decreased.
> +Special note about PCI: PCI-X specification requires PCI-X devices to support
> +64-bit addressing (DAC) for all transactions.  And at least one platform (SGI
> +SN2) requires 64-bit consistent allocations to operate correctly when the IO
> +bus is in PCI-X mode.
>  
> -Special note about PCI: PCI-X specification requires PCI-X devices to
> -support 64-bit addressing (DAC) for all transactions.  And at least
> -one platform (SGI SN2) requires 64-bit consistent allocations to
> -operate correctly when the IO bus is in PCI-X mode.
> +For correct operation, you must set the DMA mask to inform the kernel about
> +your devices DMA addressing capabilities.
>  
> -For correct operation, you must interrogate the kernel in your device
> -probe routine to see if the DMA controller on the machine can properly
> -support the DMA addressing limitation your device has.  It is good
> -style to do this even if your device holds the default setting,
> -because this shows that you did think about these issues wrt. your
> -device.
> -
> -The query is performed via a call to dma_set_mask_and_coherent()::
> +This is performed via a call to dma_set_mask_and_coherent()::
>  
>  	int dma_set_mask_and_coherent(struct device *dev, u64 mask);
>  
> -which will query the mask for both streaming and coherent APIs together.
> -If you have some special requirements, then the following two separate
> -queries can be used instead:
> +which will set the mask for both streaming and coherent APIs together.  If you
> +have some special requirements, then the following two separate calls can be
> +used instead:
>  
> -	The query for streaming mappings is performed via a call to
> +	The setup for streaming mappings is performed via a call to
>  	dma_set_mask()::
>  
>  		int dma_set_mask(struct device *dev, u64 mask);
>  
> -	The query for consistent allocations is performed via a call
> +	The setup for consistent allocations is performed via a call
>  	to dma_set_coherent_mask()::
>  
>  		int dma_set_coherent_mask(struct device *dev, u64 mask);
>  
> -Here, dev is a pointer to the device struct of your device, and mask
> -is a bit mask describing which bits of an address your device
> -supports.  It returns zero if your card can perform DMA properly on
> -the machine given the address mask you provided.  In general, the
> -device struct of your device is embedded in the bus-specific device
> -struct of your device.  For example, &pdev->dev is a pointer to the
> -device struct of a PCI device (pdev is a pointer to the PCI device
> -struct of your device).
> +Here, dev is a pointer to the device struct of your device, and mask is a bit
> +mask describing which bits of an address your device supports.  Often the
> +device struct of your device is embedded in the bus-specific device struct of
> +your device.  For example, &pdev->dev is a pointer to the device struct of a
> +PCI device (pdev is a pointer to the PCI device struct of your device).
>  
> -If it returns non-zero, your device cannot perform DMA properly on
> -this platform, and attempting to do so will result in undefined
> -behavior.  You must either use a different mask, or not use DMA.
> +These calls usually return zero to indicated your device can perform DMA
> +properly on the machine given the address mask you provided, but they might
> +return an error if the mask is too small to be supportable on the given
> +system.  If it returns non-zero, your device cannot perform DMA properly on
> +this platform, and attempting to do so will result in undefined behavior.
> +You must not use DMA on this device unless the dma_set_mask family of
> +functions has returned success.
>  
> -This means that in the failure case, you have three options:
> +This means that in the failure case, you have two options:
>  
> -1) Use another DMA mask, if possible (see below).
> -2) Use some non-DMA mode for data transfer, if possible.
> -3) Ignore this device and do not initialize it.
> +1) Use some non-DMA mode for data transfer, if possible.
> +2) Ignore this device and do not initialize it.
>  
> -It is recommended that your driver print a kernel KERN_WARNING message
> -when you end up performing either #2 or #3.  In this manner, if a user
> -of your driver reports that performance is bad or that the device is not
> -even detected, you can ask them for the kernel messages to find out
> -exactly why.
> +It is recommended that your driver print a kernel KERN_WARNING message when
> +setting the DMA mask fails.  In this manner, if a user of your driver reports
> +that performance is bad or that the device is not even detected, you can ask
> +them for the kernel messages to find out exactly why.
>  
> -The standard 32-bit addressing device would do something like this::
> +The standard 64-bit addressing device would do something like this::
>  
> -	if (dma_set_mask_and_coherent(dev, DMA_BIT_MASK(32))) {
> +	if (dma_set_mask_and_coherent(dev, DMA_BIT_MASK(64))) {
>  		dev_warn(dev, "mydev: No suitable DMA available\n");
>  		goto ignore_this_device;
>  	}
>  
> -Another common scenario is a 64-bit capable device.  The approach here
> -is to try for 64-bit addressing, but back down to a 32-bit mask that
> -should not fail.  The kernel may fail the 64-bit mask not because the
> -platform is not capable of 64-bit addressing.  Rather, it may fail in
> -this case simply because 32-bit addressing is done more efficiently
> -than 64-bit addressing.  For example, Sparc64 PCI SAC addressing is
> -more efficient than DAC addressing.
> -
> -Here is how you would handle a 64-bit capable device which can drive
> -all 64-bits when accessing streaming DMA::
> -
> -	int using_dac;
> +If the device only supports 32-bit addressing for descriptors in the
> +coherent allocations, but supports full 64-bits fro streaming mappings
                                                   ^^^
"for"

Thanks.
Shunyong.

> +it would look like this:
>  
> -	if (!dma_set_mask(dev, DMA_BIT_MASK(64))) {
> -		using_dac = 1;
> -	} else if (!dma_set_mask(dev, DMA_BIT_MASK(32))) {
> -		using_dac = 0;
> -	} else {
> -		dev_warn(dev, "mydev: No suitable DMA available\n");
> -		goto ignore_this_device;
> -	}
> -
> -If a card is capable of using 64-bit consistent allocations as well,
> -the case would look like this::
> -
> -	int using_dac, consistent_using_dac;
> -
> -	if (!dma_set_mask_and_coherent(dev, DMA_BIT_MASK(64))) {
> -		using_dac = 1;
> -		consistent_using_dac = 1;
> -	} else if (!dma_set_mask_and_coherent(dev, DMA_BIT_MASK(32))) {
> -		using_dac = 0;
> -		consistent_using_dac = 0;
> -	} else {
> +	if (dma_set_mask(dev, DMA_BIT_MASK(64))) {
>  		dev_warn(dev, "mydev: No suitable DMA available\n");
>  		goto ignore_this_device;
>  	}
> 

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