lists.openwall.net   lists  /  announce  owl-users  owl-dev  john-users  john-dev  passwdqc-users  yescrypt  popa3d-users  /  oss-security  kernel-hardening  musl  sabotage  tlsify  passwords  /  crypt-dev  xvendor  /  Bugtraq  Full-Disclosure  linux-kernel  linux-netdev  linux-ext4  linux-hardening  PHC 
Open Source and information security mailing list archives
 
Hash Suite: Windows password security audit tool. GUI, reports in PDF.
[<prev] [next>] [<thread-prev] [thread-next>] [day] [month] [year] [list]
Date:   Fri, 8 Jan 2021 14:35:32 -0500
From:   Stephen Smalley <stephen.smalley.work@...il.com>
To:     Paul Moore <paul@...l-moore.com>
Cc:     Lokesh Gidra <lokeshgidra@...gle.com>,
        Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@...hat.com>,
        Alexander Viro <viro@...iv.linux.org.uk>,
        James Morris <jmorris@...ei.org>,
        Casey Schaufler <casey@...aufler-ca.com>,
        Eric Biggers <ebiggers@...nel.org>,
        "Serge E. Hallyn" <serge@...lyn.com>,
        Eric Paris <eparis@...isplace.org>,
        Daniel Colascione <dancol@...col.org>,
        Kees Cook <keescook@...omium.org>,
        "Eric W. Biederman" <ebiederm@...ssion.com>,
        KP Singh <kpsingh@...gle.com>,
        David Howells <dhowells@...hat.com>,
        Anders Roxell <anders.roxell@...aro.org>,
        Sami Tolvanen <samitolvanen@...gle.com>,
        Matthew Garrett <matthewgarrett@...gle.com>,
        Aaron Goidel <acgoide@...ho.nsa.gov>,
        Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@...radead.org>,
        "Joel Fernandes (Google)" <joel@...lfernandes.org>,
        YueHaibing <yuehaibing@...wei.com>,
        Christian Brauner <christian.brauner@...ntu.com>,
        Alexei Starovoitov <ast@...nel.org>,
        Alexey Budankov <alexey.budankov@...ux.intel.com>,
        Adrian Reber <areber@...hat.com>,
        Aleksa Sarai <cyphar@...har.com>,
        Linux FS Devel <linux-fsdevel@...r.kernel.org>,
        linux-kernel <linux-kernel@...r.kernel.org>,
        LSM List <linux-security-module@...r.kernel.org>,
        SElinux list <selinux@...r.kernel.org>, kaleshsingh@...gle.com,
        Calin Juravle <calin@...gle.com>,
        Suren Baghdasaryan <surenb@...gle.com>,
        Jeffrey Vander Stoep <jeffv@...gle.com>,
        kernel-team@...roid.com, linux-mm@...ck.org,
        Andrew Morton <akpm@...ux-foundation.org>,
        Christoph Hellwig <hch@...radead.org>,
        Daniel Colascione <dancol@...gle.com>
Subject: Re: [PATCH v13 3/4] selinux: teach SELinux about anonymous inodes

On Wed, Jan 6, 2021 at 10:03 PM Paul Moore <paul@...l-moore.com> wrote:
>
> On Wed, Nov 11, 2020 at 8:54 PM Lokesh Gidra <lokeshgidra@...gle.com> wrote:
> > From: Daniel Colascione <dancol@...gle.com>
> >
> > This change uses the anon_inodes and LSM infrastructure introduced in
> > the previous patches to give SELinux the ability to control
> > anonymous-inode files that are created using the new
> > anon_inode_getfd_secure() function.
> >
> > A SELinux policy author detects and controls these anonymous inodes by
> > adding a name-based type_transition rule that assigns a new security
> > type to anonymous-inode files created in some domain. The name used
> > for the name-based transition is the name associated with the
> > anonymous inode for file listings --- e.g., "[userfaultfd]" or
> > "[perf_event]".
> >
> > Example:
> >
> > type uffd_t;
> > type_transition sysadm_t sysadm_t : anon_inode uffd_t "[userfaultfd]";
> > allow sysadm_t uffd_t:anon_inode { create };
> >
> > (The next patch in this series is necessary for making userfaultfd
> > support this new interface.  The example above is just
> > for exposition.)
> >
> > Signed-off-by: Daniel Colascione <dancol@...gle.com>
> > Signed-off-by: Lokesh Gidra <lokeshgidra@...gle.com>
> > ---
> >  security/selinux/hooks.c            | 56 +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
> >  security/selinux/include/classmap.h |  2 ++
> >  2 files changed, 58 insertions(+)
> >
> > diff --git a/security/selinux/hooks.c b/security/selinux/hooks.c
> > index 6b1826fc3658..d092aa512868 100644
> > --- a/security/selinux/hooks.c
> > +++ b/security/selinux/hooks.c
> > @@ -2927,6 +2927,61 @@ static int selinux_inode_init_security(struct inode *inode, struct inode *dir,
> >         return 0;
> >  }
> >
> > +static int selinux_inode_init_security_anon(struct inode *inode,
> > +                                           const struct qstr *name,
> > +                                           const struct inode *context_inode)
> > +{
> > +       const struct task_security_struct *tsec = selinux_cred(current_cred());
> > +       struct common_audit_data ad;
> > +       struct inode_security_struct *isec;
> > +       int rc;
> > +
> > +       if (unlikely(!selinux_initialized(&selinux_state)))
> > +               return 0;
> > +
> > +       isec = selinux_inode(inode);
> > +
> > +       /*
> > +        * We only get here once per ephemeral inode.  The inode has
> > +        * been initialized via inode_alloc_security but is otherwise
> > +        * untouched.
> > +        */
> > +
> > +       if (context_inode) {
> > +               struct inode_security_struct *context_isec =
> > +                       selinux_inode(context_inode);
> > +               if (context_isec->initialized != LABEL_INITIALIZED)
> > +                       return -EACCES;
> > +
> > +               isec->sclass = context_isec->sclass;
>
> Taking the object class directly from the context_inode is
> interesting, and I suspect problematic.  In the case below where no
> context_inode is supplied the object class is set to
> SECCLASS_ANON_INODE, which is correct, but when a context_inode is
> supplied there is no guarantee that the object class will be set to
> SECCLASS_ANON_INODE.  This could both pose a problem for policy
> writers (how do you distinguish the anon inode from other normal file
> inodes in this case?) as well as an outright fault later in this
> function when we try to check the ANON_INODE__CREATE on an object
> other than a SECCLASS_ANON_INODE object.
>
> It works in the userfaultfd case because the context_inode is
> originally created with this function so the object class is correctly
> set to SECCLASS_ANON_INODE, but can we always guarantee that to be the
> case?  Do we ever need or want to support using a context_inode that
> is not SECCLASS_ANON_INODE?

Sorry, I haven't been following this.  IIRC, the original reason for
passing a context_inode was to support the /dev/kvm or similar use
cases where the driver is creating anonymous inodes to represent
specific objects/interfaces derived from the device node and we want
to be able to control subsequent ioctl operations on those anonymous
inodes in the same manner as for the device node.  For example, ioctl
operations on /dev/kvm can end up returning file descriptors for
anonymous inodes representing a specific VM or VCPU or similar.  If we
propagate the security class and SID from the /dev/kvm inode (the
context inode) to the new anonymous inode, we can write a single
policy rule over all ioctl operations related to /dev/kvm.  That's
also why we used the FILE__CREATE permission here originally; that was
also intentional.  All the file-related classes including anon_inode
inherit a common set of file permissions including create and thus we
often use the FILE__<permission> in common code when checking
permission against any potentially derived class.

Powered by blists - more mailing lists