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Date:	Wed, 07 May 2008 17:52:57 +0200
From:	André Schwarz <Andre.Schwarz@...rix-vision.de>
To:	avorontsov@...mvista.com
CC:	netdev@...r.kernel.org, linuxppc-dev@...abs.org
Subject: Re: [RFC] gianfar: low gigabit throughput

Anton,

we've just built a digital GigEVision camera based on a MPC8343 running 
at 266/400 csb/core speed.

Transmission is done from a kernel module that allocates skb into which 
the image data is DMA'd by an external PCI master.
As soon as the image data is complete all buffers are sent out via 
dev->hard_start_xmit ...

Bandwidth is currently 1.3MPixel @ 50Hz which give 65MBytes/sec 
(~520MBit/s).
Of course it's UDP _without_ checksumming ....

Actually I have no sensor available that gives higher bandwidth ... but 
having a look at transmission time I'm sure the MPC8343 can easily go up 
to +800MBit.


Obviously your cpu time is consumed on a higher level.

Cheers,
André


Anton Vorontsov wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> Down here few question regarding networking throughput, I would
> appreciate any thoughts or ideas.
>
> On the MPC8315E-RDB board (CPU at 400MHz, CSB at 133 MHz) I'm observing
> relatively low TCP throughput using gianfar driver...
>
> The maximum value I've seen with the current kernels is 142 Mb/s of TCP
> and 354 Mb/s of UDP (NAPI and interrupts coalescing enabled):
>
>   root@b1:~# netperf -l 10 -H 10.0.1.1 -t TCP_STREAM -- -m 32768 -s 157344 -S 157344
>   TCP STREAM TEST to 10.0.1.1
>   #Cpu utilization 0.10
>   Recv   Send    Send
>   Socket Socket  Message  Elapsed
>   Size   Size    Size     Time     Throughput
>   bytes  bytes   bytes    secs.    10^6bits/sec
>
>   206848 212992  32768    10.00     142.40
>
>   root@b1:~# netperf -l 10 -H 10.0.1.1 -t UDP_STREAM -- -m 32768 -s 157344 -S 157344
>   UDP UNIDIRECTIONAL SEND TEST to 10.0.1.1
>   #Cpu utilization 100.00
>   Socket  Message  Elapsed      Messages
>   Size    Size     Time         Okay Errors   Throughput
>   bytes   bytes    secs            #      #   10^6bits/sec
>
>   212992   32768   10.00       13539      0     354.84
>   206848           10.00       13539            354.84
>
>
> Is this normal?
>
> netperf running in loopback gives me 329 Mb/s of TCP throughput:
>
>   root@b1:~# netperf -l 10 -H 127.0.0.1 -t TCP_STREAM -- -m 32768 -s 157344 -S 157344
>   TCP STREAM TEST to 127.0.0.1
>   #Cpu utilization 100.00
>   #Cpu utilization 100.00
>   Recv   Send    Send
>   Socket Socket  Message  Elapsed
>   Size   Size    Size     Time     Throughput
>   bytes  bytes   bytes    secs.    10^6bits/sec
>
>   212992 212992  32768    10.00     329.60
>
>
> May I consider this as a something that is close to the Linux'
> theoretical maximum for this setup? Or this isn't reliable test?
>
>
> I can compare with teh MPC8377E-RDB (very similar board - exactly the same
> ethernet phy, the same drivers are used, i.e. everything is the same from
> the ethernet stand point), but running at 666 MHz, CSB at 333MHz:
>
>          |CPU MHz|BUS MHz|UDP Mb/s|TCP Mb/s|
>   ------------------------------------------
>   MPC8377|    666|    333|     646|     264|
>   MPC8315|    400|    133|     354|     142|
>   ------------------------------------------
>   RATIO  |    1.6|    2.5|     1.8|     1.8|
>
> It seems that things are really dependant on the CPU/CSB speed.
>
> I've tried to tune gianfar driver in various ways... and it gave
> some positive results with this patch:
>
> diff --git a/drivers/net/gianfar.h b/drivers/net/gianfar.h
> index fd487be..b5943f9 100644
> --- a/drivers/net/gianfar.h
> +++ b/drivers/net/gianfar.h
> @@ -123,8 +123,8 @@ extern const char gfar_driver_version[];
>  #define GFAR_10_TIME    25600
>  
>  #define DEFAULT_TX_COALESCE 1
> -#define DEFAULT_TXCOUNT	16
> -#define DEFAULT_TXTIME	21
> +#define DEFAULT_TXCOUNT	80
> +#define DEFAULT_TXTIME	105
>  
>  #define DEFAULT_RXTIME	21
>
>
> Basically this raises the tx interrupts coalescing threshold (raising
> it more didn't help, as well as didn't help raising rx thresholds).
> Now:
>
> root@b1:~# netperf -l 3 -H 10.0.1.1 -t TCP_STREAM -- -m 32768 -s 157344 -S 157344
> TCP STREAM TEST to 10.0.1.1
> #Cpu utilization 100.00
> Recv   Send    Send
> Socket Socket  Message  Elapsed
> Size   Size    Size     Time     Throughput
> bytes  bytes   bytes    secs.    10^6bits/sec
>
> 206848 212992  32768    3.00      163.04
>
>
> That is +21 Mb/s (14% up). Not fantastic, but good anyway.
>
> As expected, the latency increased too:
>
> Before the patch:
>
> --- 10.0.1.1 ping statistics ---
> 20 packets transmitted, 20 received, 0% packet loss, time 18997ms
> rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.108/0.124/0.173/0.022 ms
>
> After:
>
> --- 10.0.1.1 ping statistics ---
> 22 packets transmitted, 22 received, 0% packet loss, time 20997ms
> rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.158/0.167/0.182/0.004 ms
>
>
> 34% up... heh. Should we sacrifice the latency in favour of throughput?
> Is 34% latency growth bad thing? What is worse, lose 21 Mb/s or 34% of
> latency? ;-)
>
>
> Thanks in advance,
>
> p.s. Btw, the patch above helps even better on the on the -rt kernels,
> since on the -rt kernels the throughput is near 100 Mb/s, with the
> patch the throughput is close to 140 Mb/s.
>
>   


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