lists.openwall.net   lists  /  announce  owl-users  owl-dev  john-users  john-dev  passwdqc-users  yescrypt  popa3d-users  /  oss-security  kernel-hardening  musl  sabotage  tlsify  passwords  /  crypt-dev  xvendor  /  Bugtraq  Full-Disclosure  linux-kernel  linux-netdev  linux-ext4  PHC 
Open Source and information security mailing list archives
 
Hash Suite: Windows password security audit tool. GUI, reports in PDF.
[<prev] [next>] [<thread-prev] [thread-next>] [day] [month] [year] [list]
Date:	Tue, 11 Nov 2014 11:36:06 -0500
From:	Brian Haley <brian.haley@...com>
To:	Ulf samuelsson <netdev@...gii.com>
CC:	Netdev <netdev@...r.kernel.org>
Subject: Re: How to make stack send broadcast ARP request when entry is STALE?

On 11/11/2014 05:08 AM, Ulf samuelsson wrote:
> If I set ucast_solicit to '0', then I always send broadcast, which is not desirable.

That seems to contradict your statement:

"The HP router is configured by a customer, and they intentionally limit replies
 to broadcast, and that is how they want it."

So I'm not understanding your question.

The best way forward would be for you to send a patch out that gets your desired
behaviour, and let others give feedback on it.

-Brian

> In the PROBE state of the ARP state machine, "probes" count from 0 .. ucast_probes.
> 
> I can see the following arguments for letting "probes" count from 
>   
>    0.. (ucast_probes + app_probes + mcast_probes)
>    
> 
> A: This is how the IPv6 is doing it. 
>      It is not standardized in IPv4, but why should the IPv4 have a different behaviour?
> 
> B: If you do not send out broadcast if unicast fails, then a broadcast will be sent out 
>      anyway, once the ARP entry is removed by the garbage collector.
>      You get an annoyingly long delay before that happens.
> 
> C: If a large data centre does not want broadcasts to be sent out, 
>      then they can set mcast_probes to 0, in which case no broadcasts will be sent
>      out in PROBE state.
> 
> D:  When in other states, the counter runs until it a reply is had, or the counter wraps around.
>       It is sending broadcast all the time.
> 
> 
> Best Regards
> Ulf Samuelsson
> ulf@...gii.com
> +46  (722) 427 437
> 
> 
>> 10 nov 2014 kl. 23:52 skrev Brian Haley <brian.haley@...com>:
>>
>>> On 11/07/2014 05:11 AM, Ulf samuelsson wrote:
>>> The HP router is configured by a customer, and they intentionally limit replies
>>> to broadcast, and that is how they want it.
>>
>> So this is the crux of the problem - the customer has configured the router so
>> that it doesn't play well with most modern network stacks that try and use
>> unicast so they don't send unnecessary broadcast packets.  I don't know why I
>> thought this was something wrong with the router software.
>>
>> Did you try this?
>>
>> $ sudo sysctl net.ipv4.neigh.eth0.ucast_solicit=0
>>
>> It works for me.
>>
>> And they really should re-think their decision on that configuration setting.
>>
>> -Brian
>>
>>
>>> In the previous version of the build system, the Interpeak stack was used
>>> and this would in PROBE state send unicast ARP request, and if that failed
>>> send broadcast ARP.
>>>
>>> The native linux stack, when in PROBE state sends only unicast until it decides
>>> that it should enter FAILED state.
>>>
>>> The 'mcast_probes' variable seems to be totally ignored, except the first  time,
>>> so I do not see why it is there.
>>>
>>> Best Regards
>>> Ulf Samuelsson
>>> ulf@...gii.com
>>> +46  (722) 427 437
>>>
>>>
>>>>> 7 nov 2014 kl. 10:54 skrev Brian Haley <brian.haley@...com>:
>>>>>
>>>>> On 11/05/2014 07:48 AM, Ulf samuelsson wrote:
>>>>> Have a problem with an HP router at a certain location, which
>>>>> is configured to only answer to broadcast ARP requests.
>>>>> That cannot be changed.
>>>>
>>>> Sorry to hear about the problem, but my only suggestions would be to try the latest firmware and/or put a call in to support.  I don't happen work in the division that makes routers...
>>>>
>>>>> The first ARP request the kernel sends out, is a broadcast request,
>>>>> which is fine, but after the reply, the kernel sends unicast requests,
>>>>> which will not get any replies.
>>>>
>>>> You might be able to hack this by inserting an ebtables rule - check the dnat target section of the man page - don't know the exact syntax but it would probably end in '-j dnat --to-destination ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff'
>>>>
>>>> -Brian
>>>> --
>>>> To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe netdev" in
>>>> the body of a message to majordomo@...r.kernel.org
>>>> More majordomo info at  http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
>>> --
>>> To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe netdev" in
>>> the body of a message to majordomo@...r.kernel.org
>>> More majordomo info at  http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
>>>
>>
> 

--
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe netdev" in
the body of a message to majordomo@...r.kernel.org
More majordomo info at  http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html

Powered by blists - more mailing lists