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Date:   Thu, 16 May 2019 11:14:35 +0800
From:   Zhangshaokun <zhangshaokun@...ilicon.com>
To:     Will Deacon <will.deacon@....com>,
        Robin Murphy <robin.murphy@....com>
CC:     Ard Biesheuvel <ard.biesheuvel@...aro.org>,
        <linux-arm-kernel@...ts.infradead.org>, <netdev@...r.kernel.org>,
        <ilias.apalodimas@...aro.org>,
        "huanglingyan (A)" <huanglingyan2@...wei.com>,
        <steve.capper@....com>
Subject: Re: [PATCH] arm64: do_csum: implement accelerated scalar version

Hi Will,

On 2019/5/15 17:47, Will Deacon wrote:
> On Mon, Apr 15, 2019 at 07:18:22PM +0100, Robin Murphy wrote:
>> On 12/04/2019 10:52, Will Deacon wrote:
>>> I'm waiting for Robin to come back with numbers for a C implementation.
>>>
>>> Robin -- did you get anywhere with that?
>>
>> Still not what I would call finished, but where I've got so far (besides an
>> increasingly elaborate test rig) is as below - it still wants some unrolling
>> in the middle to really fly (and actual testing on BE), but the worst-case
>> performance already equals or just beats this asm version on Cortex-A53 with
>> GCC 7 (by virtue of being alignment-insensitive and branchless except for
>> the loop). Unfortunately, the advantage of C code being instrumentable does
>> also come around to bite me...
> 
> Is there any interest from anybody in spinning a proper patch out of this?
> Shaokun?

HiSilicon's Kunpeng920(Hi1620) benefits from do_csum optimization, if Ard and
Robin are ok, Lingyan or I can try to do it.
Of course, if any guy posts the patch, we are happy to test it.
Any will be ok.

Thanks,
Shaokun

> 
> Will
> 
>> /* Looks dumb, but generates nice-ish code */
>> static u64 accumulate(u64 sum, u64 data)
>> {
>> 	__uint128_t tmp = (__uint128_t)sum + data;
>> 	return tmp + (tmp >> 64);
>> }
>>
>> unsigned int do_csum_c(const unsigned char *buff, int len)
>> {
>> 	unsigned int offset, shift, sum, count;
>> 	u64 data, *ptr;
>> 	u64 sum64 = 0;
>>
>> 	offset = (unsigned long)buff & 0x7;
>> 	/*
>> 	 * This is to all intents and purposes safe, since rounding down cannot
>> 	 * result in a different page or cache line being accessed, and @buff
>> 	 * should absolutely not be pointing to anything read-sensitive.
>> 	 * It does, however, piss off KASAN...
>> 	 */
>> 	ptr = (u64 *)(buff - offset);
>> 	shift = offset * 8;
>>
>> 	/*
>> 	 * Head: zero out any excess leading bytes. Shifting back by the same
>> 	 * amount should be at least as fast as any other way of handling the
>> 	 * odd/even alignment, and means we can ignore it until the very end.
>> 	 */
>> 	data = *ptr++;
>> #ifdef __LITTLE_ENDIAN
>> 	data = (data >> shift) << shift;
>> #else
>> 	data = (data << shift) >> shift;
>> #endif
>> 	count = 8 - offset;
>>
>> 	/* Body: straightforward aligned loads from here on... */
>> 	//TODO: fancy stuff with larger strides and uint128s?
>> 	while(len > count) {
>> 		sum64 = accumulate(sum64, data);
>> 		data = *ptr++;
>> 		count += 8;
>> 	}
>> 	/*
>> 	 * Tail: zero any over-read bytes similarly to the head, again
>> 	 * preserving odd/even alignment.
>> 	 */
>> 	shift = (count - len) * 8;
>> #ifdef __LITTLE_ENDIAN
>> 	data = (data << shift) >> shift;
>> #else
>> 	data = (data >> shift) << shift;
>> #endif
>> 	sum64 = accumulate(sum64, data);
>>
>> 	/* Finally, folding */
>> 	sum64 += (sum64 >> 32) | (sum64 << 32);
>> 	sum = sum64 >> 32;
>> 	sum += (sum >> 16) | (sum << 16);
>> 	if (offset & 1)
>> 		return (u16)swab32(sum);
>>
>> 	return sum >> 16;
>> }
> 
> .
> 

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