lists.openwall.net   lists  /  announce  owl-users  owl-dev  john-users  john-dev  passwdqc-users  yescrypt  popa3d-users  /  oss-security  kernel-hardening  musl  sabotage  tlsify  passwords  /  crypt-dev  xvendor  /  Bugtraq  Full-Disclosure  linux-kernel  linux-netdev  linux-ext4  linux-hardening  PHC 
Open Source and information security mailing list archives
 
Hash Suite: Windows password security audit tool. GUI, reports in PDF.
[<prev] [next>] [<thread-prev] [thread-next>] [day] [month] [year] [list]
Date:   Tue, 12 May 2020 09:34:11 -0700
From:   Martin KaFai Lau <kafai@...com>
To:     Jakub Sitnicki <jakub@...udflare.com>
CC:     <netdev@...r.kernel.org>, <bpf@...r.kernel.org>,
        <dccp@...r.kernel.org>, <kernel-team@...udflare.com>,
        Alexei Starovoitov <ast@...nel.org>,
        Daniel Borkmann <daniel@...earbox.net>,
        "David S. Miller" <davem@...emloft.net>,
        Eric Dumazet <edumazet@...gle.com>,
        Gerrit Renker <gerrit@....abdn.ac.uk>,
        Jakub Kicinski <kuba@...nel.org>,
        Andrii Nakryiko <andrii.nakryiko@...il.com>
Subject: Re: [PATCH bpf-next v2 00/17] Run a BPF program on socket lookup

On Tue, May 12, 2020 at 01:57:45PM +0200, Jakub Sitnicki wrote:
> On Mon, May 11, 2020 at 09:45 PM CEST, Martin KaFai Lau wrote:
> > On Mon, May 11, 2020 at 08:52:01PM +0200, Jakub Sitnicki wrote:
> >
> > [ ... ]
> >
> >> Performance considerations
> >> ==========================
> >>
> >> Patch set adds new code on receive hot path. This comes with a cost,
> >> especially in a scenario of a SYN flood or small UDP packet flood.
> >>
> >> Measuring the performance penalty turned out to be harder than expected
> >> because socket lookup is fast. For CPUs to spend >= 1% of time in socket
> >> lookup we had to modify our setup by unloading iptables and reducing the
> >> number of routes.
> >>
> >> The receiver machine is a Cloudflare Gen 9 server covered in detail at [0].
> >> In short:
> >>
> >>  - 24 core Intel custom off-roadmap 1.9Ghz 150W (Skylake) CPU
> >>  - dual-port 25G Mellanox ConnectX-4 NIC
> >>  - 256G DDR4 2666Mhz RAM
> >>
> >> Flood traffic pattern:
> >>
> >>  - source: 1 IP, 10k ports
> >>  - destination: 1 IP, 1 port
> >>  - TCP - SYN packet
> >>  - UDP - Len=0 packet
> >>
> >> Receiver setup:
> >>
> >>  - ingress traffic spread over 4 RX queues,
> >>  - RX/TX pause and autoneg disabled,
> >>  - Intel Turbo Boost disabled,
> >>  - TCP SYN cookies always on.
> >>
> >> For TCP test there is a receiver process with single listening socket
> >> open. Receiver is not accept()'ing connections.
> >>
> >> For UDP the receiver process has a single UDP socket with a filter
> >> installed, dropping the packets.
> >>
> >> With such setup in place, we record RX pps and cpu-cycles events under
> >> flood for 60 seconds in 3 configurations:
> >>
> >>  1. 5.6.3 kernel w/o this patch series (baseline),
> >>  2. 5.6.3 kernel with patches applied, but no SK_LOOKUP program attached,
> >>  3. 5.6.3 kernel with patches applied, and SK_LOOKUP program attached;
> >>     BPF program [1] is doing a lookup LPM_TRIE map with 200 entries.
> > Is the link in [1] up-to-date?  I don't see it calling bpf_sk_assign().
> 
> Yes, it is, or rather was.
> 
> The reason why the inet-tool version you reviewed was not using
> bpf_sk_assign(), but the "old way" from RFCv2, is that the switch to
> map_lookup+sk_assign was done late in development, after changes to
> SOCKMAP landed in bpf-next.
> 
> By that time performance tests were already in progress, and since they
> take a bit of time to set up, and the change affected just the scenario
> with program attached, I tested without this bit.
> 
> Sorry, I should have explained that in the cover letter. The next round
> of benchmarks will be done against the now updated version of inet-tool
> that uses bpf_sk_assign:
> 
> https://github.com/majek/inet-tool/commit/6a619c3743aaae6d4882cbbf11b616e1e468b436
> 
> >
> >>
> >> RX pps measured with `ifpps -d <dev> -t 1000 --csv --loop` for 60 seconds.
> >>
> >> | tcp4 SYN flood               | rx pps (mean ± sstdev) | Δ rx pps |
> >> |------------------------------+------------------------+----------|
> >> | 5.6.3 vanilla (baseline)     | 939,616 ± 0.5%         |        - |
> >> | no SK_LOOKUP prog attached   | 929,275 ± 1.2%         |    -1.1% |
> >> | with SK_LOOKUP prog attached | 918,582 ± 0.4%         |    -2.2% |
> >>
> >> | tcp6 SYN flood               | rx pps (mean ± sstdev) | Δ rx pps |
> >> |------------------------------+------------------------+----------|
> >> | 5.6.3 vanilla (baseline)     | 875,838 ± 0.5%         |        - |
> >> | no SK_LOOKUP prog attached   | 872,005 ± 0.3%         |    -0.4% |
> >> | with SK_LOOKUP prog attached | 856,250 ± 0.5%         |    -2.2% |
> >>
> >> | udp4 0-len flood             | rx pps (mean ± sstdev) | Δ rx pps |
> >> |------------------------------+------------------------+----------|
> >> | 5.6.3 vanilla (baseline)     | 2,738,662 ± 1.5%       |        - |
> >> | no SK_LOOKUP prog attached   | 2,576,893 ± 1.0%       |    -5.9% |
> >> | with SK_LOOKUP prog attached | 2,530,698 ± 1.0%       |    -7.6% |
> >>
> >> | udp6 0-len flood             | rx pps (mean ± sstdev) | Δ rx pps |
> >> |------------------------------+------------------------+----------|
> >> | 5.6.3 vanilla (baseline)     | 2,867,885 ± 1.4%       |        - |
> >> | no SK_LOOKUP prog attached   | 2,646,875 ± 1.0%       |    -7.7% |
> > What is causing this regression?
> >
> 
> I need to go back to archived perf.data and see if perf-annotate or
> perf-diff provide any clues that will help me tell where CPU cycles are
> going. Will get back to you on that.
> 
> Wild guess is that for udp6 we're loading and coping more data to
> populate v6 addresses in program context. See inet6_lookup_run_bpf
> (patch 7).
If that is the case,
rcu_access_pointer(net->sk_lookup_prog) should be tested first before
doing ctx initialization.

> 
> This makes me realize the copy is unnecessary, I could just store the
> pointer to in6_addr{}. Will make this change in v3.
> 
> As to why udp6 is taking a bigger hit than udp4 - comparing top 10 in
> `perf report --no-children` shows that in our test setup, socket lookup
> contributes less to CPU cycles on receive for udp4 than for udp6.
> 
> * udp4 baseline (no children)
> 
> # Overhead       Samples  Symbol
> # ........  ............  ......................................
> #
>      8.11%         19429  [k] fib_table_lookup
>      4.31%         10333  [k] udp_queue_rcv_one_skb
>      3.75%          8991  [k] fib4_rule_action
>      3.66%          8763  [k] __netif_receive_skb_core
>      3.42%          8198  [k] fib_rules_lookup
>      3.05%          7314  [k] fib4_rule_match
>      2.71%          6507  [k] mlx5e_skb_from_cqe_linear
>      2.58%          6192  [k] inet_gro_receive
>      2.49%          5981  [k] __x86_indirect_thunk_rax
>      2.36%          5656  [k] udp4_lib_lookup2
> 
> * udp6 baseline (no children)
> 
> # Overhead       Samples  Symbol
> # ........  ............  ......................................
> #
>      4.63%         11100  [k] udpv6_queue_rcv_one_skb
>      3.88%          9308  [k] __netif_receive_skb_core
>      3.54%          8480  [k] udp6_lib_lookup2
>      2.69%          6442  [k] mlx5e_skb_from_cqe_linear
>      2.56%          6137  [k] ipv6_gro_receive
>      2.31%          5540  [k] dev_gro_receive
>      2.20%          5264  [k] do_csum
>      2.02%          4835  [k] ip6_pol_route
>      1.94%          4639  [k] __udp6_lib_lookup
>      1.89%          4540  [k] selinux_socket_sock_rcv_skb
> 
> Notice that __udp4_lib_lookup didn't even make the cut. That could
> explain why adding instructions to __udp6_lib_lookup has more effect on
> RX PPS.
> 
> Frankly, that is something that suprised us, but we didn't have time to
> investigate further, yet.
The perf report should be able to annotate bpf prog also.
e.g. may be part of it is because the bpf_prog itself is also dealing
with a longer address?  

> 
> >> | with SK_LOOKUP prog attached | 2,520,474 ± 0.7%       |   -12.1% |
> > This also looks very different from udp4.
> >
> 
> Thanks for the questions,
> Jakub

Powered by blists - more mailing lists