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Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2015 20:59:56 +0100
From: Jean-Philippe Aumasson <jeanphilippe.aumasson@...il.com>
To: discussions@...sword-hashing.net
Subject: Re: [PHC] PHC status report

Criteria such as elegance or simplicity are also important, and you're
right that these aren't measurable. Let me also refer to the SHA-3
competition, by quoting NIST's final announcement: "NIST chose KECCAK
over the four other excellent finalists for its elegant design, large
security margin, (...)"
http://csrc.nist.gov/groups/ST/hash/sha-3/sha-3_selection_announcement.pdf.

Criteria in the call for submissions were not exhaustive, and it was
the job of submitters to optimize the engineering and presentation
quality of their submission.

I encourage you to look back at the AES candidates, and compare (say)
the elegance of AES vs. that of Mars :-)





On Wed, Feb 11, 2015 at 8:22 PM, Donghoon Chang <pointchang@...il.com> wrote:
> I would like to add more comments on the following new criteria.
>
> 1. Elegance of design
> 2. Originality and innovation
>
> Unlike the criteria in art or literature, the criteria of standards or
> algorithms related to the security of system should be able to be measured
> by scientific ways.
>
> Now, a question arises, "given an algorithm, how can we measure the elegance
> of design and originality and innovation of the algorithm in scientific
> ways?"
>
> As far as I know, there were (or are) no such criteria in cases of AES,
> SHA-3, Caesar competitions, because such criteria are not scientifically
> measurable! I believe that they can be only measurable by a biased
> favoritism!
>
> In the link (https://password-hashing.net/index.html), it is written, "To
> identify new password hashing schemes suitable for widespread adoption, the
> PHC follows the model of focused cryptographic competitions such as AES,
> eSTREAM, or SHA-3 (see the Cryptographic competitions website)." However, I
> wonder whether the PHC follows the model of focused cryptographic
> competitions or not.
>
> - Donghoon Chang
>
>
>
>
>
> 2015-02-11 21:16 GMT+05:30 Donghoon Chang <pointchang@...il.com>:
>>
>> In the beginning of the competition, the criteria were clearly mentioned
>> from the following link.
>>
>> https://password-hashing.net/call.html
>>
>> However, as mentioned from another following link, when 9 candidates have
>> been recently selected, new criteria, which are totally unrelated to the
>> original ones, were added.
>>
>> https://password-hashing.net/report1.html
>>
>> The two new criteria are added as follows:
>>
>> 1. Elegance of design
>> 2. Originality and innovation
>>
>> I wondered who added these new criteria, which were never mentioned
>> before, without the request of any permission of changing it internally and
>> publicly.
>>
>> Due to the above new criteria, some of the candidates were not selected.
>> Directly speaking, the new criteria were secretly created, which is against
>> the rule of competition, to kick out those candidates, which is unfair and
>> even a crime.
>>
>> Another main issue of the PHC is that 9 candidates were chosen without
>> providing comparison results with proper metrics, which are against all
>> other competitions such as AES, SHA-3, Caesar Competitons, etc. The
>> competition should be scientifically based on proper metrics with clear
>> comparison (not based on voting out of favoritism), according to the
>> criteria which were given in the beginning.
>>
>> Since I was one of internal evaluators of SHA-3 candidates as a guest
>> researcher of NIST for three years, it more seems to me that the procedure
>> of the PHC looks immature to me. Even the PHC panel's recent selecting
>> procedure undermines the dignity of the PHC, the PHC panel, submitters, and
>> even crypto community. Please think it seriously.
>>
>> I hope that the PHC panel might accept and correct their mistake and make
>> every effort to restore our dignity including everyone participating in the
>> PHC.
>>
>> - Donghoon Chang
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> 2015-02-11 16:37 GMT+05:30 Krisztián Pintér <pinterkr@...il.com>:
>>>
>>> On Tue, Feb 10, 2015 at 4:00 PM, Solar Designer <solar@...nwall.com>
>>> wrote:
>>> > I think publishing the upvote and downvote counts
>>>
>>> counts? why not the votes themselves? why is it a secret? normally
>>> secret voting protects the voters from retaliation. i don't think it
>>> applies to that case. on the contrary, keeping the vote secret (as
>>> well as unexplained) casts the shadow of doubt on the rationality of
>>> it.
>>>
>>>
>>> > we used the voting as a tool to focus
>>> > further discussion rather than to definitively choose the finalists.
>>>
>>> i was under the impression that the voting was the selection method.
>>> if it wasn't, then it indeed does not matter much. what matters is the
>>> actual rationale, what the selection was based on.
>>>
>>>
>>> > I guess you'd prefer some scoring system?  It wouldn't work.  Opinions
>>> > varied on what properties would be best to have vs. to avoid, so we
>>> > couldn't possibly have arrived at a common scoring system.
>>>
>>> the very reason to have a detailed rationale is that people don't have
>>> to agree the result, they can rely on the facts. if the panel declares
>>> a winner using one set of preferences, but that does not coincide my
>>> own preferences, i can still use the results to find my own winner for
>>> my own situation.
>>>
>>>
>>> >> this discussion should also be summarized, anonimized, and made
>>> >> public.
>>> > That's significant effort that's unlikely to address your concerns.
>>>
>>> that is the only task the panel had. you are talking about skipping
>>> the only reason this competition exists. when you signed up to this,
>>> what is it exactly that you offered to do? also, how is it that it
>>> does not address my concerns? my concern is that the selection process
>>> is not transparent, and basically no information is published.
>>> publishing the actual decision process exactly solves that problem.
>>
>>
>

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