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Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 04:21:55 +0300
From: Solar Designer <solar@...nwall.com>
To: discussions@...sword-hashing.net
Subject: Re: [PHC] GPU benchmarks: Lyra2+yescrypt (was: Another PHC candidates "mechanical" tests (ROUND2))

A minor update on Lyra2 vs. yescrypt CPU/GPU benchmarks:

On Sun, Jul 26, 2015 at 03:47:50AM +0200, Solar Designer wrote:
> Agnieszka has prepared results for these more practically relevant
> settings as well, tuning for roughly same defensive use performance on
> CPU as is achieved with bcrypt cost 5 (traditionally used for bcrypt
> benchmarks).  An optimized defensive implementation of bcrypt on
> i7-4770K achieves ~4300 c/s cumulative for 8 independent processes or
> threads (as would be the case for password hashing on an authentication
> server).  (FWIW, an attack-optimized implementation, with multiple
> instances of bcrypt combined per thread, achieves ~6600 c/s on this CPU.)
> 
> Similar defensive use performance of Lyra2 and yescrypt, both with their
> memory (de)allocation overhead kept out of the loop, is achieved at
> around 1.5 MB (or maybe closer to 2 MB for yescrypt).  We chose to test
> both at 1.5 MB.  For Lyra2, this is achieved by setting m_cost=64 (so
> it's 64 rows of 24 KB each).  For yescrypt, it is achieved by setting
> N=2048 r=6 (so it's 2048 rows of 768 bytes each).  (We could also test
> other combinations, like N=1024 r=12, which I expect would work in
> yescrypt's favor in terms of GPU attack resistance.  We could even go
> all the way up to 24 KB for an interesting comparison.  Agnieszka, feel
> free to try those.  Smaller r may be preferable against attacks with
> other devices, such as where Argon team's TMTO attack is relevant.)
> 
> Here are the current results:
> 
> Lyra2
> 
> i7-4770K - 3808
> GeForce GTX 960M - 506
> Radeon HD 7970 GE (*) - 2438
> GeForce GTX TITAN (**) - 1625
> 
> yescrypt
> 
> i7-4770K - 4736
> GeForce GTX 960M - 416
> Radeon HD 7970 GE (*) - 930
> GeForce GTX TITAN (**) - 1107

Two days later (and yes, I should have posted this in here way sooner
than now), Agnieszka came up with revised results, IIRC with corrected
randomization of passwords being tested.  These aren't very different
from the above.  Nevertheless, here they are:

Lyra2

i7-4770K - 3792
GeForce GTX 960M - 629
Radeon HD 7970 GE (*) - 2844
GeForce GTX TITAN (**) - 1638

yescrypt

i7-4770K - 4736
GeForce GTX 960M - 419
Radeon HD 7970 GE (*) - 914
GeForce GTX TITAN (**) - 1050

Same footnotes apply:

> (*) We actually use one GPU in HD 7990 at 1.0 GHz, which is equivalent
> to HD 7970 GE.
> (**) With slight overclocking by the GPU card vendor.
> 
> Raw detail:
> 
> http://www.openwall.com/lists/john-dev/2015/07/25/21

New raw detail:

http://www.openwall.com/lists/john-dev/2015/07/27/6

> As you can see, both are slower on GPU than on CPU, but yescrypt fares
> better, especially on the AMD GCN device.  CPU/GPU speed ratio advantage
> of yescrypt over Lyra2:
> 
> 4736/416 / (3808/506) = 1.51
> 4736/930 / (3808/2438) = 3.26
> 4736/1107 / (3808/1625) = 1.83

4736/419 / (3792/629) = 1.87
4736/914 / (3792/2844) = 3.89
4736/1050 / (3792/1638) = 1.95

As you can see, these show slightly better advantage of yescrypt.

> (BTW, I expect Argon2 as currently defined to perform worse than Lyra2
> at this test.  But this is yet to be seen.  Hopefully soon.)

We have such results now.  I'll post them separately.

Alexander

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