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From: jlevitsk at joshie.com (Joshua Levitsky)
Subject: Re:

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Burnes, James" <james.burnes@....com>
Sent: Tuesday, November 04, 2003 12:12 PM


> Redhat is not the enemy.  Being a business, they have mouths to feed and
> stockholders to please.  That they can do that a make a modest profit is a
> pretty interesting proposition.  They do that through support.  Enterprise
> support is where the profit is.

I understand that, but I also understand that they went in to the Linux
business and not the Windows business. While Fedora may end up being
wonderful... it's interesting that yesterday the general release was due out
and it's late. (At least that's what the note says on fedora.redhat.com.) If
late releases, a Rawhide mentality, and not being a priority on security
patches are going to be the norm then frankly I will invest my time with
Debian or Slackware.

> They have contributed to Open Source time and time again, so we know the
> stuff that they are made of.  Don't forget that they are suing those
> bastards SCO also.  Without someone making money that would not be
possible.
> Of course, SCO is going to fade into irrelevance just as soon as IBMs army
> of attorneys eats them for lunch and follows it up with a little snack
> called Canopy. If the trail doesn't lead to Redmond, I'd be very
surprised.

They are suing SCO for their own survival and not for any sort of love of
the community. The fact is that if SCO proves they are right then anyone
that Red Hat sold enterprise OSs to will have to shell out another $650 or
so to SCO per server. This would be the death of Red Hat. (And other Linux's
as well.)  Sure there may have been some good intention in there as well.
There are great people on the non-sales side at Red Hat. Don't kid yourself
though about the point of Red Hat fighting SCO. It's so they can stay in
business.

> Given a choice, I'm more of a Slackware guy but I don't have a problem
using
> RedHat when necessary.  Sure beats the alternatives at the corporate
level.

Interesting. How does Slackware or Debian make money?

-Josh


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